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Academic Paper


Title: Age grading in the Montréal French inflected future
Author: Suzanne Evans Wagner
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.msu.edu/~wagnersu
Institution: Michigan State University
Author: Gillian Sankoff
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~gillian/home.html
Institution: University of Pennsylvania
Linguistic Field: Historical Linguistics; Language Acquisition; Sociolinguistics
Subject Language: French
Abstract: The rise of the periphrastic future (PF) at the expense of the inflected future (IF) is an established historical trend in Québécois French over at least the past 150 years. Previous research has also found higher rates of PF among younger speakers, many displaying categorical use in affirmative contexts. Because an apparent time interpretation of the synchronic data fits the historical record, we expected concomitant speaker stability across the lifespan. On the contrary, our panel study of 60 Montréal speakers (1971–1984) reveals age grading in a retrograde direction. As they aged, two-thirds of the speakers we studied increased their frequency of IF, an effect heightened for members of higher socioprofessional groups. Though not sufficiently robust to stem the historical tide, increased IF use by older speakers may retard the change somewhat, providing continuing IF input to child L1 acquisition. Rather than vitiating an apparent time interpretation, these results indicate that the rate of change may be slightly overestimated if age grading acts in a retrograde direction.

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This article appears IN Language Variation and Change Vol. 23, Issue 3, which you can READ on Cambridge's site .



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