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Words in Time and Place: Exploring Language Through the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary

By David Crystal

Offers a unique view of the English language and its development, and includes witty commentary and anecdotes along the way.


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The Indo-European Controversy: Facts and Fallacies in Historical Linguistics

By Asya Pereltsvaig and Martin W. Lewis

This book "asserts that the origin and spread of languages must be examined primarily through the time-tested techniques of linguistic analysis, rather than those of evolutionary biology" and "defends traditional practices in historical linguistics while remaining open to new techniques, including computational methods" and "will appeal to readers interested in world history and world geography."


Academic Paper


Title: Unsupervised lexicon induction for clause-level detection of evaluations
Author: Hiroshi Kanayama
Institution: IBM Research – Tokyo
Author: Tetsuya Nasukawa
Institution: IBM Research – Tokyo
Linguistic Field: Computational Linguistics; Text/Corpus Linguistics
Abstract: This article proposes clause-level evaluation detection, which is a fine-grained type of opinion mining, and describes an unsupervised lexicon building method for capturing domain-specific knowledge by leveraging the similar polarities of sentiments between adjacent clauses. The lexical entries to be acquired are called polar atoms, the minimum human-understandable syntactic structures that specify the polarity of clauses. As a hint to obtain candidate polar atoms, we use context coherency, the tendency for the same polarity to appear successively in a context. Using the overall density and precision of coherency in the corpus, the statistical estimation picks up appropriate polar atoms from among the candidates, without any manual tuning of the threshold values. The experimental results show that the precision of polarity assignment with the automatically acquired lexicon was 83 per cent on average, and our method is robust for corpora in diverse domains and for the size of the initial lexicon.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Natural Language Engineering Vol. 18, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site .



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