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Jost Gippert: Our Featured Linguist!

"Buenos dias", "buenas noches" -- this was the first words in a foreign language I heard in my life, as a three-year old boy growing up in developing post-war Western Germany, where the first gastarbeiters had arrived from Spain. Fascinated by the strange sounds, I tried to get to know some more languages, the only opportunity being TV courses of English and French -- there was no foreign language education for pre-teen school children in Germany yet in those days. Read more



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What is English? And Why Should We Care?

By: Tim William Machan

To find some answers Tim Machan explores the language's present and past, and looks ahead to its futures among the one and a half billion people who speak it. His search is fascinating and important, for definitions of English have influenced education and law in many countries and helped shape the identities of those who live in them.


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Medical Writing in Early Modern English

Edited by Irma Taavitsainen and Paivi Pahta

This volume provides a new perspective on the evolution of the special language of medicine, based on the electronic corpus of Early Modern English Medical Texts, containing over two million words of medical writing from 1500 to 1700.


Academic Paper


Title: Datasets for generic relation extraction
Author: B. Hachey
Institution: Macquarie University
Author: Claire Grover
Institution: University of Edinburgh
Author: R. Tobin
Institution: University of Edinburgh
Linguistic Field: Computational Linguistics; Text/Corpus Linguistics
Abstract: A vast amount of usable electronic data is in the form of unstructured text. The relation extraction task aims to identify useful information in text (e.g. PersonW works for OrganisationX, GeneY encodes ProteinZ) and recode it in a format such as a relational database or RDF triplestore that can be more effectively used for querying and automated reasoning. A number of resources have been developed for training and evaluating automatic systems for relation extraction in different domains. However, comparative evaluation is impeded by the fact that these corpora use different markup formats and notions of what constitutes a relation. We describe the preparation of corpora for comparative evaluation of relation extraction across domains based on the publicly available ACE 2004, ACE 2005 and BioInfer data sets. We present a common document type using token standoff and including detailed linguistic markup, while maintaining all information in the original annotation. The subsequent reannotation process normalises the two data sets so that they comply with a notion of relation that is intuitive, simple and informed by the semantic web. For the ACE data, we describe an automatic process that automatically converts many relations involving nested, nominal entity mentions to relations involving non-nested, named or pronominal entity mentions. For example, the first entity is mapped from ‘one’ to ‘Amidu Berry’ in the membership relation described in ‘Amidu Berry, one half of PBS’. Moreover, we describe a comparably reannotated version of the BioInfer corpus that flattens nested relations, maps part-whole to part-part relations and maps n-ary to binary relations. Finally, we summarise experiments that compare approaches to generic relation extraction, a knowledge discovery task that uses minimally supervised techniques to achieve maximally portable extractors. These experiments illustrate the utility of the corpora.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Natural Language Engineering Vol. 18, Issue 1, which you can read on Cambridge's site .



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