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The Vulgar Tongue: Green's History of Slang

By Jonathon Green

A comprehensive history of slang in the English speaking world by its leading lexicographer.


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The Universal Structure of Categories: Towards a Formal Typology

By Martina Wiltschko

This book presents a new theory of grammatical categories - the Universal Spine Hypothesis - and reinforces generative notions of Universal Grammar while accommodating insights from linguistic typology.


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Academic Paper


Title: Allocation of Attention to Second Language Form and Meaning
Author: Kara Morgan-Short
Email: click here to access email
Institution: University of Illinois at Chicago
Author: Jeanne Heil
Institution: University of Illinois at Chicago
Author: Andrea Botero-Moriarty
Institution: University of Illinois at Chicago
Author: Shane Ebert
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://uic.academia.edu/ShaneEbert
Institution: University of Illinois at Chicago
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition
Abstract: The aims of the present study were twofold. The study addressed the issues of simultaneous attention to form and meaning in second language (L2) written input and reactivity of think-alouds. Specifically, the study examined the comprehension of L2 learners of Spanish who either attended to lexical or grammatical forms while reading for meaning or read for meaning alone. Learners completed these tasks while either thinking aloud or not. Results indicated only a minimal effect for thinking aloud that did not appear to compromise the internal validity of the study. Additionally, results showed that attending to grammatical or lexical form while reading for meaning did not affect comprehension. Indeed, learners who processed these forms more deeply evidenced greater comprehension. These findings are considered in light of methodological issues and the larger issue of simultaneous attention to form and meaning in a L2.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Studies in Second Language Acquisition Vol. 34, Issue 4, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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