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Oxford Handbook of Corpus Phonology

Edited by Jacques Durand, Ulrike Gut, and Gjert Kristoffersen

Offers the first detailed examination of corpus phonology and serves as a practical guide for researchers interested in compiling or using phonological corpora


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The Languages of the Jews: A Sociolinguistic History

By Bernard Spolsky

A vivid commentary on Jewish survival and Jewish speech communities that will be enjoyed by the general reader, and is essential reading for students and researchers interested in the study of Middle Eastern languages, Jewish studies, and sociolinguistics.


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Indo-European Linguistics

New Open Access journal on Indo-European Linguistics is now available!


Academic Paper


Title: Individual differences reveal stages of L2 grammatical acquisition: ERP evidence
Author: Darren Scott Tanner
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.personal.psu.edu/dst12/index.html
Institution: Pennsylvania State University
Author: Judith McLaughlin
Institution: University of Washington
Author: Julia Rogers Herschensohn
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://depts.washington.edu/lingweb/Faculty_Herschensohn.php
Institution: University of Washington
Author: Lee Osterhout
Institution: University of Washington
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition; Psycholinguistics
Abstract: Here we report findings from a cross-sectional study of morphosyntactic processing in native German speakers and native English speakers enrolled in college-level German courses. Event-related brain potentials were recorded while participants read sentences that were either well-formed or violated German subject–verb agreement. Results showed that grammatical violations elicited large P600 effects in the native Germans and learners enrolled in third-year courses. Grand mean waveforms for learners enrolled in first-year courses showed a biphasic N400–P600 response. However, subsequent correlation analyses revealed that most individuals showed either an N400 or a P600, but not both, and that brain response type was associated with behavioral measures of grammatical sensitivity. These results support models of second language acquisition which implicate qualitative changes in the neural substrates of second language grammar processing associated with learning. Importantly, we show that new insights into L2 learning result when the cross-subject variability is treated as a source of evidence rather than a source of noise.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Bilingualism: Language and Cognition Vol. 16, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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