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Language Planning as a Sociolinguistic Experiment

By: Ernst Jahr

Provides richly detailed insight into the uniqueness of the Norwegian language development. Marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of the Norwegian nation following centuries of Danish rule


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Acquiring Phonology: A Cross-Generational Case-Study

By Neil Smith

The study also highlights the constructs of current linguistic theory, arguing for distinctive features and the notion 'onset' and against some of the claims of Optimality Theory and Usage-based accounts.


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Language Production and Interpretation: Linguistics meets Cognition

By Henk Zeevat

The importance of Henk Zeevat's new monograph cannot be overstated. [...] I recommend it to anyone who combines interests in language, logic, and computation [...]. David Beaver, University of Texas at Austin


Academic Paper


Title: 'VC vs. CV syllables: a comparison of Aboriginal languages with English'
Author: MarijaTabain
Email: click here to access email
Institution: 'La Trobe University'
Author: GavanBreen
Institution: 'Institute for Aboriginal Development'
Author: AndrewButcher
Institution: 'Flinders University'
Linguistic Field: 'Phonetics; Phonology'
Subject Language: 'Yanyuwa'
' Yindjibarndi'
' English'
Abstract: Traditionally, phonological theory has held that the CV syllable is the basic syllable type across the world's languages. Recently however, Breen and Pensalfini (1999) have challenged the primacy of the CV syllable in phonological theory with data from Arrernte, an Aboriginal language spoken in central Australia. In this study, we set out to see if there is any acoustic phonetic basis to Breen and Pensalfini's claim. We examine real-word data from one speaker of Arrernte, five speakers of English, and three speakers each of Yanyuwa and Yindjibarndi (these are two other Aboriginal languages). Using F2 and F3 measures of the consonant, and locus equation measures, we find that CV does show more stability than VC in the English speakers' data, but that for the Aboriginal language speakers' data, there is a parity between the CV and VC measures. We suggest that this greater parity may be a necessary constraint on languages which have multiple places of articulation (six in the case of the Aboriginal languages studied here). We propose an alternative view of suprasegmental organization, and we suggest that more work is needed in order to understand the phonetic bases of suprasegmental structure.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Journal of the International Phonetic Association Vol. 34, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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