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The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


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Free Access 4 You

Free access to several Brill linguistics journals, such as Journal of Jewish Languages, Language Dynamics and Change, and Brill’s Annual of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics.


Academic Paper


Title: Moving toward a unified effort to understand the nature and causes of language disorders
Author: Mabel L. Rice
Institution: University of Kansas
Author: Steven F Warren
Institution: University of Kansas
Linguistic Field: Cognitive Science; Neurolinguistics; Psycholinguistics
Abstract: The nature and causes of language disorders are research topics familiar to the readership of Applied Psycholinguistics. Current inquiries place these topics in a dynamic and sprawling multidisciplinary context manifested through investigations of linguistic acquisition, cognitive development, genetics, neurocortical processes, cognitive neurolinguistics, behavioral phenotypes, and language intervention. This list is not complete by any means, but it does suggest the wide front of the current search for better knowledge about what causes language disorders and the dimensions of language acquisition that are affected. Although there is considerable momentum underway in current inquiries, the full potential for scientific advancement is hampered by fragmentation in the field, in part attributable to partitioning by diagnostic categories of affectedness. Investigators (and their funding sources) often focus on a particular clinical group, such as specific language impairment (SLI), autism-autism spectrum disorders (ASD), Williams syndrome (WS), Down syndrome (DS), or fragile X syndrome (FXS). Although this is not exclusively the case, it is relatively difficult to carry out comparative studies across the multiple clinical conditions in which language disorders appear and to monitor developments across such a wide front of investigation. The consequence is that findings are distributed across different publication outlets and different groups of scholars, a situation that can limit our appreciation of the ways in which language disorders are manifest, and the identification of common etiological factors.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 26, Issue 1, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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