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The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


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Academic Paper


Title: A bidirectional study on the acquisition of plural noun phrase interpretation in English and Spanish
Author: Tania Ionin
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.linguistics.illinois.edu/people/tionin
Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Author: Silvina A Montrul
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.linguistics.illinois.edu/people/montrul
Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Author: Mónica Crivos
Institution: Universidad CAECE sede Mar del Plata
Linguistic Field: Psycholinguistics
Abstract: This paper investigates how learners interpret definite plural noun phrases (e.g., the tigers) and bare (article-less) plural noun phrases (e.g., tigers) in their second language. Whereas Spanish allows definite plurals to have both generic and specific readings, English requires definite plurals to have specific, nongeneric readings. Generic readings in English are expressed with bare plurals, which are ungrammatical in Spanish in preverbal subject position. Two studies were conducted in order to investigate the role of first language transfer in this domain in both English → Spanish and Spanish → English directions. Study 1 used a meaning-focused task to probe learners’ interpretation of definite plural nour phrases, whereas Study 2 used a form-focused task to examine learners’ judgments of the acceptability of definite and bare plurals in generic versus specific contexts. First language transfer was attested in both directions, at lower proficiency levels, whereas more targetlike performance was attested at higher proficiency levels. Furthermore, learners were found to be more successful in learning about the (un)grammaticality of bare plurals in the target language than in assigning the target interpretation to definite versus bare plurals. This finding is shown to be consistent with other studies’ findings of plural noun phrase interpretation in monolingual and bilingual children.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 34, Issue 3, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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