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Linguistic Diversity and Social Justice

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Language Evolution: The Windows Approach

By Rudolf Botha

Language Evolution: The Windows Approach addresses the question: "How can we unravel the evolution of language, given that there is no direct evidence about it?"


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Academic Paper


Title: Recruiting a nonlocal language for performing local identity: Indexical appropriations of Lingala in the Congolese border town Goma
Author: Karen Büscher
Institution: Ghent University
Author: Sigurd D'hondt
Institution: Ghent University
Author: Michael Meeuwis
Institution: Ghent University
Linguistic Field: Discourse Analysis; Pragmatics; Sociolinguistics
Subject Language: Lingala
Abstract: This article describes discursive processes by which inhabitants of the Congolese border town Goma attribute new indexical values to Lingala, a language exogenous to the area of which most Goma inhabitants only possess limited knowledge. This creative reconfiguration of indexicalities results in the emergence of three “indexicalities of the second order”: the indexing of (i) being a true Congolese, (ii) toughness (based on Lingala's association with the military), and (iii) urban sophistication (based on its association with the capital Kinshasa). While the last two second-order reinterpretations are also widespread in other parts of the Congolese territory, the first one, resulting in the emergence of a Lingala as an “indexical icon” of a corresponding “language community,” deeply reflects local circumstances and concerns, in particular the sociopolitical volatility of the Rwandan-Congolese borderland that renders publicly affirming one's status as an “autochthonous” Congolese pivotal for assuring a livelihood and at times even personal security. (Lingala, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Goma, orders of indexicality, language community, autochthony, Kiswahili)

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This article appears IN Language in Society Vol. 42, Issue 5, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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