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The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


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Free Access 4 You

Free access to several Brill linguistics journals, such as Journal of Jewish Languages, Language Dynamics and Change, and Brill’s Annual of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics.


Academic Paper


Title: Interpretation of contrastive pitch accent in six- to eleven-year-old English-speaking children (and adults)
Author: Kiwako Ito
Institution: Ohio State University
Author: Sarah A. Bibyk
Institution: University of Rochester
Author: Laura Wagner
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://faculty.psy.ohio-state.edu/wagner/
Institution: Ohio State University
Author: Shari R. Speer
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.ling.ohio-state.edu/~speer
Institution: Ohio State University
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition; Phonetics
Subject Language: English
Abstract: Both off-line and on-line comprehension studies suggest not only toddlers and preschoolers, but also older school-age children have trouble interpreting contrast-marking pitch prominence. To test whether children achieve adult-like proficiency in processing contrast-marking prosody during school years, an eye-tracking experiment examined the effect of accent on referential resolution in six- to eleven-year-old children and adults. In all age groups, a prominent accent facilitated the detection of a target in contrastive discourse sequences (pink cat→ cat), whereas it led to a garden path in non-contrastive sequences (pink rabbit→ monkey: the initial fixations were on rabbits). While the data indicate that children as young as age six immediately interpret contrastive accent, even the oldest child group showed delayed fixations compared to adults. We argue that the children's slower recovery from the garden path reflects the gradual development in cognitive flexibility that matures independently of general oculomotor control.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Journal of Child Language Vol. 41, Issue 1, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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