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Raciolinguistics

Edited by H. Samy Alim, John R. Rickford, and Arnetha F. Ball

Raciolinguistics "Brings together a critical mass of scholars to form a new field dedicated to theorizing and analyzing language and race together."


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Sociolinguistics from the Periphery

By Sari Pietikäinen, FinlandAlexandra Jaffe, Long BeachHelen Kelly-Holmes, and Nikolas Coupland

Sociolinguistics from the Periphery "presents a fascinating book about change: shifting political, economic and cultural conditions; ephemeral, sometimes even seasonal, multilingualism; and altered imaginaries for minority and indigenous languages and their users."


Academic Paper


Title: Gaps in second language sentence processing
Author: Theodoros Marinis
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.personal.reading.ac.uk/~lls05tm/
Institution: University of Reading
Author: Leah Roberts
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Homepage: http://www.mpi.nl/world/persons/profession/leahro.html
Institution: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
Author: Claudia Felser
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Institution: Universität Potsdam
Author: Harald Clahsen
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://privatewww.essex.ac.uk/~harald/
Institution: Universität Potsdam
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition
Subject Language: Chinese, Mandarin
German
Greek, Modern
Japanese
Abstract: Four groups of second language (L2) learners of English from different language backgrounds (Chinese, Japanese, German, and Greek) and a group of native speaker controls participated in an online reading time experiment with sentences involving long-distance wh-dependencies. Although the native speakers showed evidence of making use of intermediate syntactic gaps during processing, the L2
learners appeared to associate the fronted wh-phrase directly with its lexical subcategorizer, regardless of whether the subjacency constraint was operative in their native language. This finding is argued to support the hypothesis that nonnative comprehenders underuse syntactic information in L2 processing.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Studies in Second Language Acquisition Vol. 27, Issue 1.

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