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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

The Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. This volume contains up-to-date and extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.


Academic Paper


Title: Syllabically Conditioned Perceptual Epenthesis
Author: Barış Kabak
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://ling.uni-konstanz.de/pages/home/kabak/
Institution: Universität Konstanz
Author: William James Idsardi
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.ling.udel.edu/idsardi/
Institution: University of Delaware
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition; Phonetics; Phonology; Psycholinguistics
Subject Language: English
Korean
Abstract: This article focuses on perceptual epenthesis; a phenomenon where listeners/L/perceive illusory vowels within consonant clusters which deviate from the/L/phonotactic norms of their native language (see Dupoux et al., 1999). We/L/present results from an experiment on Korean listeners' perception of/L/English consonant clusters which replicates and extends previous studies on/L/Japanese. Our primary aim is to tease apart two explanations for perceptual/L/epenthesis which are confounded in the Japanese studies: consonantal contact/L/violations and syllable structure violations. In light of our results, we/L/suggest here that perceptual epenthesis is caused by syllable structure/L/violations rather than illicit consonantal contact. In addition, we show/L/that speech perception is not always governed by the same system of rules/L/and restrictions that govern speech production. We discuss the consequences/L/of the non-isomorphism between speech production and perception observed in/L/our experiment in the context of the P-map hypothesis (Steriade, 2001a, b)./L/Furthermore, we show that frequency-based analyses fail to account for our/L/results.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Venue: In: Nowak, P. et al. (eds.). Proceedings of the Berkeley Linguistics
Publication Info: Published in 2003


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