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The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


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Free Access 4 You

Free access to several Brill linguistics journals, such as Journal of Jewish Languages, Language Dynamics and Change, and Brill’s Annual of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics.


Academic Paper


Title: Machine learning-based named entity recognition via effective integration of various evidences
Author: Guodong Zhou
Institution: Institute for Infocomm Research
Author: Jian Su
Institution: Institute for Infocomm Research
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics
Abstract: Named entity recognition identifies and classifies entity names in a text document into some predefined categories. It resolves the 'who', 'where' and 'how much' problems in information extraction and leads to the resolution of the 'what' and 'how' problems in further processing. This paper presents a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) and proposes a HMM-based named entity recognizer implemented as the system PowerNE. Through the HMM and an effective constraint relaxation algorithm to deal with the data sparseness problem, PowerNE is able to effectively apply and integrate various internal and external evidences of entity names. Currently, four evidences are included: (1) a simple deterministic internal feature of the words, such as capitalization and digitalization; (2) an internal semantic feature of the important triggers; (3) an internal gazetteer feature, which determines the appearance of the current word string in the provided gazetteer list; and (4) an external macro context feature, which deals with the name alias phenomena. In this way, the named entity recognition problem is resolved effectively. PowerNE has been benchmarked with the Message Understanding Conferences (MUC) data. The evaluation shows that, using the formal training and test data of the MUC-6 and MUC-7 English named entity tasks, and it achieves the F-measures of 96.6 and 94.1, respectively. Compared with the best reported machine learning system, it achieves a 1.7 higher F-measure with one quarter of the training data on MUC-6, and a 3.6 higher F-measure with one ninth of the training data on MUC-7. In addition, it performs slightly better than the best reported handcrafted rule-based systems on MUC-6 and MUC-7.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Natural Language Engineering Vol. 11, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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