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Academic Paper


Title: Use of complex phonological patterns in speech processing: evidence from Korean
Author: Natasha L. Warner
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.u.arizona.edu/~nwarner
Institution: University of Arizona
Author: Jeesun Kim
Institution: University of Melbourne
Author: Chris Davis
Institution: University of Melbourne
Author: Anne Cutler
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.mpi.nl/people/cutler-anne
Institution: Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics
Linguistic Field: Phonology
Subject Language: Korean
Abstract: Korean has a very complex phonology, with many interacting alternations. In a coronal-/i/ sequence, depending on the type of phonological boundary present, alternations such as palatalization, nasal insertion, nasal assimilation, coda neutralization, and intervocalic voicing can apply. This paper investigates how the phonological patterns of Korean affect processing of morphemes and words. Past research on languages such as English, German, Dutch, and Finnish has shown that listeners exploit syllable structure constraints in processing speech and segmenting it into words. The current study shows that in parsing speech, listeners also use much more complex patterns that relate the surface phonological string to various boundaries.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Journal of Linguistics Vol. 41, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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