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Vowel Length From Latin to Romance

By Michele Loporcaro

This book "draws on extensive empirical data, including from lesser known varieties" and "puts forward a new account of a well-known diachronic phenomenon."


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Letter Writing and Language Change

Edited By Anita Auer, Daniel Schreier, and Richard J. Watts

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Academic Paper


Title: An articulatory examination of word-final flapping at phrase edges and interiors
Author: Teruhiko Fukaya
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: Sugiyama Jogakuen University
Author: Dani Byrd
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www-rcf.usc.edu/~dbyrd/dbyrd.html
Institution: University of Southern California
Linguistic Field: Phonology
Abstract: Formulations of flapping as a symbolic phonological rule suggest clear articulatory differences between flaps and stops, and often offer no overt explanation for why phrase boundaries should block the alternation. The present study explores the articulatory foundation of the distinction between flaps and non-flaps in word-final position. We examine kinematic and acoustic data for these articulations in phrase-final and phrase-medial positions and in falling- and level-stress contours. It is shown that a discrepancy exists between acoustic and articulatory durational patterning – while acoustic durations of flaps are shorter than those of non-flaps overall, their articulatory durations are not uniformly so. It is important to consider multiple potential articulatory sources – both spatial and temporal – for the acoustic shortness that characterizes flaps, including spatial reduction, temporal articulatory shortening, and changes in intergestural coordination. The kinematic data indicate that different sources of word-final flap shortness exist for different speakers and different prosodic conditions, suggesting that gradient variability in the spatiotemporal patterning of tongue-tip constrictions yields acoustic shortening in word-final flaps.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Journal of the International Phonetic Association Vol. 35, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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