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Academic Paper


Title: The role of transfer in language variation and change: Evidence from contact varieties of French
Author: Jeanine Treffers-Daller
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.reading.ac.uk/education/about/staff/j-c-treffers~daller.aspx
Institution: University of Reading
Author: Raymond Mougeon
Institution: York University
Linguistic Field: Sociolinguistics
Abstract: In this Special Issue, the focus is on contact-induced language variation and change in situations of societal bilingualism that involve long-term contact between French and another language. As is well known, when two or more languages are spoken by groups of speakers in the same geographical area, over time, features from one language can be transferred to the other language, especially when the languages in question are unequal in terms of prestige, institutional support and demographic factors. The process that leads to the adoption of such features in the contact languages is generally known as INTERFERENCE or TRANSFER, and these terms are also used to describe the features in question (i.e. the end product of the process of transfer). In this issue we prefer to use the term TRANSFER over the use of the notion INTERFERENCE, as the former has fewer negative connotations than the latter.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Bilingualism: Language and Cognition Vol. 8, Issue 2, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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