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Oxford Handbook of Corpus Phonology

Edited by Jacques Durand, Ulrike Gut, and Gjert Kristoffersen

Offers the first detailed examination of corpus phonology and serves as a practical guide for researchers interested in compiling or using phonological corpora


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The Languages of the Jews: A Sociolinguistic History

By Bernard Spolsky

A vivid commentary on Jewish survival and Jewish speech communities that will be enjoyed by the general reader, and is essential reading for students and researchers interested in the study of Middle Eastern languages, Jewish studies, and sociolinguistics.


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Indo-European Linguistics

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Academic Paper


Title: Paraphrasing spoken Chinese using a paraphrase corpus
Author: Jie Zhang
Email: click here to access email
Institution: Pennsylvania State University
Author: Kazuhide Yamamoto
Institution: Nagaoka University of Technology
Linguistic Field: Computational Linguistics; Text/Corpus Linguistics; Translation
Abstract: One of the key issues in spoken-language translation is how to deal with unrestricted expressions in spontaneous utterances. We have developed a paraphraser for use as part of a translation system, and in this paper we describe the implementation of a Chinese paraphraser for a Chinese-Japanese spoken-language translation system. When an input sentence cannot be translated by the transfer engine, the paraphraser automatically transforms the sentence into alternative expressions until one of these alternatives can be translated by the transfer engine. Two primary issues must be dealt with in paraphrasing: how to determine new expressions, and how to retain the meaning of the input sentence. We use a pattern-based approach in which the meaning is retained to the greatest possible extent without deep parsing. The paraphrase patterns are acquired from a paraphrase corpus and human experience. The paraphrase instances are automatically extracted and then generalized into paraphrase patterns. A total of 1719 paraphrase patterns obtained using this method and an implemented paraphraser were used in a paraphrasing experiment. The results showed that the implemented paraphraser generated 1.7 paraphrases on average for each test sentence and achieved an accuracy of 88%.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Natural Language Engineering Vol. 11, Issue 4, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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