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Holy Sh*t: A Brief History of Swearing

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Academic Paper


Title: How do you like your doughnuts?
Author: Nigel G. Duffield
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.shef.ac.uk/english/staff/profiles/nigelduffield.html
Institution: University of Sheffield
Linguistic Field: Psycholinguistics; Syntax
Abstract: Ever since the derivational theory of complexity (DTC) apparently bit the dust in the late 1960s, experimental psycholinguistics have been afflicted by a dualism at least as troublesome as the mind/brain dichotomy, namely, the grammar/parser distinction. The idea that mentally represented grammar is something fully dissociated from the human language processor is less than compelling, yet it has implicitly informed much of the last half century's psycholinguistics practice on both sides of the formalist–functionalist divide.

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This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 27, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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