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Vowel Length From Latin to Romance

By Michele Loporcaro

This book "draws on extensive empirical data, including from lesser known varieties" and "puts forward a new account of a well-known diachronic phenomenon."


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Letter Writing and Language Change

Edited By Anita Auer, Daniel Schreier, and Richard J. Watts

This book "challenges the assumption that there is only one 'legitimate' and homogenous form of English or of any other language" and "supports the view of different/alternative histories of the English language and will appeal to readers who are skeptical of 'standard' language ideology."


Academic Paper


Title: The Segmental Phonology of Nineteenth-century Tristan da Cunha English: convergence and local innovation
Author: Peter Trudgill
Institution: Universitet i Agder
Author: Daniel Schreier
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.es.unizh.ch
Institution: Universit├Ąt Z├╝rich
Linguistic Field: Phonology; Sociolinguistics
Subject Language: English
Abstract: This article looks into convergence processes that involve distinct phonological systems in dialect contact situations, exemplified by the variety of English that developed on Tristan da Cunha, an island in the South Atlantic Ocean. Based on a discussion of the community's social history and an auditory analysis of the segmental phonology of late nineteenth-century Tristan da Cunha English, this article reconstructs the early contact scenario and looks into both phonological convergence and independent innovative mechanisms that accompany new-dialect formation. The data presented here show that dialect contact gives rise to mixing of several inputs (so that 'new' dialects draw features from several ancestral varieties), that the interaction of transplanted dialects may also trigger independent, variety-specific mechanisms, and that the interplay of feature retention, input mixing, and local innovation lead to distinctive and (on occasion) endemic varieties of English.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN English Language and Linguistics Vol. 10, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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