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On the Offensive

By Karen Stollznow

On the Offensive " This book sheds light on the derogatory phrases, insults, slurs, stereotypes, tropes and more that make up linguistic discrimination. Each chapter addresses a different area of prejudice: race and ethnicity; gender identity; sexuality; religion; health and disability; physical appearance; and age."


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Academic Paper


Title: The Development of Phonological Stratification: Evidence from Stop Voicing Perception in Gurindji Kriol and Roper Kriol
Paper URL: http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/10.1163/19552629-01101003
Author: Jesse Stewart
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://jessestewart.net
Institution: University of Saskatchewan
Author: Felicity Meakins
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/547
Author: Cassandra Algy
Linguistic Field: Phonetics
Subject Language: Kriol
Abstract: This study tests the effect of multilingualism and language contact on consonant perception. Here, we explore the emergence of phonological stratification using two alternative forced-choice (2AFC) identification task experiments to test listener perception of stop voicing with contrasting minimal pairs modified along a 10-step continuum. We examine a unique language ecology consisting of three languages spoken in Northern Territory, Australia: Roper Kriol (an English-lexifier creole language), Gurindji (Pama-Nyungan), and Gurindji Kriol (a mixed language derived from Gurindji and Kriol). In addition, this study focuses on three distinct age groups: children (group I, 8>), preteens to middle-aged adults (group II, 10–58), and older adults (group III, 65+). Results reveal that both Kriol and Gurindji Kriol listeners in group II contrast the labial series [p] and [b]. Contrarily, while alveolar [t] and velar [k] were consistently identifiable by the majority of participants (74%), their voiced counterparts ([d] and [g]) showed random response patterns by 61% of the participants. Responses to the voiced stimuli from the preteen-adult Kriol group were, however, significantly more consistent than in the Gurindji Kriol group, suggesting Kriol listeners may be further along in acquiring the voicing contrast. Significant results regarding listener exposure to Standard English in both language groups also suggests constant exposure to English maybe a catalyst for setting this change in motion. The more varied responses from the Gurindji, Kriol, and Gurindji Kriol listeners in groups II and III, who have little exposure to English, help support these findings.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: Journal of Languge Contact, 11(1): 71-112
URL: http://booksandjournals.brillonline.com/content/journals/10.1163/19552629-01101003
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