Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info

New from Oxford University Press!


It's Been Said Before

By Orin Hargraves

It's Been Said Before "examines why certain phrases become clichés and why they should be avoided -- or why they still have life left in them."

New from Cambridge University Press!


Sounds Fascinating

By J. C. Wells

How do you pronounce biopic, synod, and Breughel? - and why? Do our cake and archaic sound the same? Where does the stress go in stalagmite? What's odd about the word epergne? As a finale, the author writes a letter to his 16-year-old self.

Email this page

TOC Description

Email this message to a friend

Journal Title: Journal of Child Language
Volume/Issue:   37 / 3
Date: 2010
Table of Contents: Modeling the contribution of phonotactic cues to the problem of word segmentation
by Daniel Blanchard, Jeffrey N. Heinz, Roberta Michnick Golinkoff
pp 487-511

Variability, negative evidence, and the acquisition of verb argument constructions
by Amy Perfors, Joshua B Tenenbaum, Elizabeth Wonnacott
pp 607-642

Morphosyntactic annotation of CHILDES transcripts
by Kenji Sagae, Eric Davis, Alon Lavie, Brian Macwhinney, Shuly Wintner
pp 705-729

Words in puddles of sound: modelling psycholinguistic effects in speech segmentation
by Padraic Monaghan, Morten H Christiansen
pp 545-564

Computational models of child language learning: an introduction
by Brian Macwhinney
pp 477-485

Segmenting words from natural speech: subsegmental variation in segmental cues
by C Anton Rytting, Chris Brew, Eric Fosler-Lussier
pp 513-543

Cognitive architectures and language acquisition: A case study in pronoun comprehension
by Jacolien van Rij, Hedderik Van Rijn, Petra Hendriks
pp 731-766

Implicational markedness and frequency in constraint-based computational models of phonological learning
by Gaja Jarosz
pp 565-606

An empirical generative framework for computational modeling of language acquisition
by Heidi R Waterfall, Ben Sandbank, Luca Onnis, Shimon Edelman
pp 671-703

Explaining quantitative variation in the rate of Optional Infinitive errors across languages: A comparison of MOSAIC and the Variational Learning Model
by Daniel Freudenthal, Julian M Pine, Fernand Gobet
pp 643-669

Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Linguistic Field(s): Computational Linguistics
Language Acquisition
LL Issue: 21.1992