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"Buenos dias", "buenas noches" -- this was the first words in a foreign language I heard in my life, as a three-year old boy growing up in developing post-war Western Germany, where the first gastarbeiters had arrived from Spain. Fascinated by the strange sounds, I tried to get to know some more languages, the only opportunity being TV courses of English and French -- there was no foreign language education for pre-teen school children in Germany yet in those days. Read more



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What is English? And Why Should We Care?

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To find some answers Tim Machan explores the language's present and past, and looks ahead to its futures among the one and a half billion people who speak it. His search is fascinating and important, for definitions of English have influenced education and law in many countries and helped shape the identities of those who live in them.


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Medical Writing in Early Modern English

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This volume provides a new perspective on the evolution of the special language of medicine, based on the electronic corpus of Early Modern English Medical Texts, containing over two million words of medical writing from 1500 to 1700.



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TOC Description

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Journal Title: Applied Psycholinguistics
Volume/Issue:   33/3
Date: 2012
Table of Contents: Do young bilinguals acquire past tense morphology like monolinguals, only later? Evidence from French–English and Chinese–English bilinguals
by Elena Nicoladis, Jianhui Song, Paula Marentette
pp 457-479

Phonotactics and morphophonology in early child language: Evidence from Dutch
by Tania S. Zamuner, Annemarie Kerkhoff, Paula Fikkert
pp 481-499

Comparison of native versus nonnative perception of vowel length contrasts in Arabic and Japanese
by Kimiko Tsukada
pp 501-516

Cognitive mechanism of writing to dictation of logographic characters
by Zaizhu Han, Luping Song, Yanchao Bi
pp 517-537

Feature types and object categories: Is sensorimotoric knowledge different for living and nonliving things?
by Carrie A. Ankerstein, Rosemary A. Varley, Patricia E. Cowell
pp 539-569

Processing reflexives in a second language: The timing of structural and discourse-level constraints
by Claudia Felser, Ian Cunnings
pp 571-603

Cross-linguistic differences in the immediate serial recall of consonants versus vowels
by Elizabeth Maria Kissling
pp 605-621

Native and nonnative processing of Japanese pitch accent
by Xianghua Wu, Jung-Yueh Tu, Yue Wang
pp 623-641

Second language learners' vocabulary expansion is associated with improved second language vowel intelligibility
by Rikke L. Bundgaard-Nielsen, Catherine T. Best, Christian Kroos, Michael D. Tyler
pp 643-664

Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Linguistic Field(s): Phonology
Psycholinguistics
Semantics
Writing Systems
Language Acquisition
Subject Language(s): Arabic, Standard
Chinese, Mandarin
Dutch
English
French
German
Japanese
 
LL Issue: 23.4000