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"Buenos dias", "buenas noches" -- this was the first words in a foreign language I heard in my life, as a three-year old boy growing up in developing post-war Western Germany, where the first gastarbeiters had arrived from Spain. Fascinated by the strange sounds, I tried to get to know some more languages, the only opportunity being TV courses of English and French -- there was no foreign language education for pre-teen school children in Germany yet in those days. Read more



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Journal Title: Token: A Journal of English Linguistics
Volume/Issue:   1/1
Date: 2012
Table of Contents: 1/2012; 189pp.

John M. Anderson (University of Edinburgh; emeritus)
Parasitic passives of intransitives in English. 5-22

Marina Dossena (University of Bergamo)
Sense and sensibility: verbal morpho-syntax in nineteenth-century Scottish emigrants’ letters and the intersection of standard and vernacular usage. 23-36

Stefania Maci (University of Bergamo)
The language of tourism regulations in the European Union. 37-58

Andreea S. Calude & Gerald Delahunty (University of Reading and Colorado State University)
Inferentials: fixed or not? 59-83

Patrice Larroque (Paul Valery University, Montpellier)
The prepositions at and to: opposite points of view. 85-95

Joanna Esquibel & Anna Wojtyś (University of Warsaw)
Devil aka Satan: an enemy or fiend? On the rivalry between the familiar and the foreign in early English. 97-113

Magdalena Murawska (Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań)
Patient imaging in medical case reports. 115-127

Daisuke Suzuki (Kyoto University)
A corpus-based study of modal adverbs in English: from the viewpoint of grammaticalization. 129-141

Elena Salakhyan (Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen)
Tübingen Corpus of Eastern European English (TCEEE): from a small-scale corpus study to newly emerging non-native English variety. 143-157

Oskar Gawlik (Jan Kochanowski University of Kielce)
On the complementation of start, begin and continue in spoken academic English. 159-170

Łukasz Stolarski (Jan Kochanowski University of Kielce)
Size-sound symbolism in car names. 171-189

The full text of the articles published in Volume 1 is available at http://www.ujk.edu.pl/token/
Courtesy of the Jan Kochanowski University Press)

Token focuses on English linguistics in a broad sense, taking in both diachronic and synchronic work, grammatical as well as lexical studies. That being said, the journal favors empirical research. All submissions are double-blind peer reviewed.
Publisher: Jan Kochanowski University of Kielce
Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics
 
LL Issue: 24.1495