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"Buenos dias", "buenas noches" -- this was the first words in a foreign language I heard in my life, as a three-year old boy growing up in developing post-war Western Germany, where the first gastarbeiters had arrived from Spain. Fascinated by the strange sounds, I tried to get to know some more languages, the only opportunity being TV courses of English and French -- there was no foreign language education for pre-teen school children in Germany yet in those days. Read more



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Discussion Details




Title: Modern Bibliography: "ser" vs. "estar" in Old Spanish
Submitter: Roberto García
Description: Hello. I'd like to know if you can recommend me some new books or articles about the origin of the difference in verbs ''ser'' and ''estar'' in Spanish. I know that the difference is present also in Portuguese (and ''gallego''), so I think that maybe the roots of this is in a big branch that includes the ''galaico-portugués'' and the ''leonés'' (which I've read is the basis of Spanish -''castellano''-).

According to Ricardo Carballo Calero, Portuguese and Spanish were originated as dialects of ''gallego'' and ''leonés'' respectively, which, in time, were originated from a ''protorromance galaico''. If his hypothesis were true, does it mean that the beginning of our structure ser-estar started in this ''protorromance galaico''?

Thank you for your help and sorry for the Spanish words I haven't translated into English (I didn't know how to do it).

Roberto García
Perú
Date Posted: 18-Feb-2008
Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics
Language Specialty: Spanish, Old
LL Issue: 19.561
Posted: 18-Feb-2008

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