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Title: The Event We Call Perception
Submitter: Stefan Andersson
Description: My attempts to understand the event we call perception started off
several years ago and this is what I now ask myself:

1.) What can we learn from people who hear their own thoughts as
alien voices and in response to non-verbal environmental sounds are
able to generate the perception of an external voice ''that retain certain
acoustic features that were present in the original signal'' ?

2.) Are we only able to use covert speech and generate the perception
of an external voice ''that retain certain acoustic features that were
present in the original signal'' in response to non-verbal environmental
sounds ?

3.) Are people able to hear the sensory consequence of covert speech
in integration with what they were able to select with a corresponding
top-down sensory expectation ?

4.) Can the gestures you are about to produce during covert speech
when you are able to hear the sensory consequence of covert speech
like the gestures you intend to produce during overt speech determine
what you expect to hear and can a top-down sensory expectation like
this be used to select all features matching the sensory consequence
you are about to produce ?

5.) Why do people lose the ability to generate an act of will with which
they are able to consciously control covert speech ?

6.) Do people lose the ability to control covert speech and hear their
own thoughts as alien voices because they are forced to divide their
attention between two similar tasks ?

7.) Will not what you are able to select, when you are trying to hear the
voice you are about to produce, automatically correspond to some
features matching the sensory consequence you are about to produce
and can not the attention you devote to a competing task due to a
similarity more effectively suppress the ability control how you respond
?

8.) Can two in some way similar tasks compete with each other more
than two different tasks because the available attention capacity is set
(limited) as if you were to perform only one task ?

9.) Why am I the only one who uses a well known experience many
people share in an attempt to make it easier to understand the lack of
voluntary control ?

10.) Can the lost ability to generate an act of will with which you are
able to consciously control covert speech with regards to a certain goal
be as essential to our ability to restore and better distinguish a verbal
message as it can be devastating to people with an integration disorder
referred to as schizophrenia ?

11.) Can what you are able to attend when you are trying to hear the
voice you are about to produce more or less suppress the ability to
control covert speech and do people who more or less lose the ability
to control covert speech more or less lose the ability to inhibit a verbal
response ?

12.) Can what you are able to attend when you are trying to hear the
voice you are about to produce be more demanding when you get a
better match between a corresponding top-down sensory expectation
and bottom-up sensory signals ?

13.) Is it harder to inhibit a verbal response when you get a better
match between a corresponding top-down sensory expectation and
bottom-up sensory signals and will this result in a tendency to produce
the most equivalent sensory consequence you are able to produce ?

14.) Can bottom-up sensory signals affect the outcome of competition
between response tendencies and will this result in a tendency to
produce the most equivalent sensory consequence you are able to
produce ?

15.) Are you able to integrate all features matching the sensory
consequence you are about to produce when bottom-up sensory
signals affect the outcome of competition between response
tendencies and will this generate the informative event we call
perception in response to a more or less distorted verbal message ?

16.) Can the lost ability to inhibit a verbal response serve the purpose
of not letting an act of will interfere with the ability to select the gestures
you need to use in response to a verbal message and will the lost
ability to choose how you respond result in that you find it much harder
to disregard the context you are exposed to and experience ?

17.) Can covert speech with its sensory consequence heard in
integration with all features matching a corresponding top-down
sensory expectation, thanks to a tendency to produce a rather
equivalent sensory consequence, be used to distinguish a verbal
message while a sensitivity to the context you are exposed to and
experience makes it possible to restore a more or less distorted verbal
message ?

18.) Are stimuli to which you make the same response categorized
when you hear the sensory consequence of a specific gesture in
integration with all features matching a corresponding top-down
sensory expectation (what you are able to hear more subjectively will in
response to different stimuli sound alike) and can a sensitivity to the
context you are exposed to and experience make it possible to
categorize (and learn how to categorize) what you are able to
distinguish in response to acoustically highly variable speech sounds ?

19.) Are people able to restore and better distinguish a verbal message
when they lack the ability to inhibit a verbal response and with a short
delay hear the sensory consequence of covert speech in integration
with what they were able to select with a corresponding top-down
sensory expectation ?

20.) Was Alvin M. Liberman more than 50 years ago correct in his
assumption that “the articulatory movements and their sensory effects
mediate between the acoustic stimulus and the event we call
perception” ?

21.) Are you able to reveal a verbal illusion when you expect to hear
the sensory consequence you are about to produce and all features
matching what you expect to hear can be taken out of their peripheral
existence without generating a match between a top-down sensory
expectation and bottom-up sensory signals ?

22.) Will the ability to reveal a verbal illusion (a mismatch) result in that
you lack the motivation to execute and are able to inhibit a verbal
response ?

23.) Are you able to integrate all features matching the sensory
consequence you are about to produce when bottom-up sensory
signals affect the outcome of competition between response
tendencies and will this generate the informative event we call
perception in response to auditory, visual, somatosensory, olfactory,
and gustatory stimuli ?

Stefan Andersson
Date Posted: 14-Mar-2012
Linguistic Field(s): Cognitive Science
LL Issue: 23.1287
Posted: 14-Mar-2012

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