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Conference Information



Full Title: Optimising the Human Factor in Translation: Facing the Technological Challenge

      
Location: Rennes, France
Start Date: 06-Jun-2013 - 06-Jun-2013
Contact: Kelly Falaise
Meeting Email: click here to access email
Meeting URL: http://www.translator-training.eu/optimale/index.php?option=com_jevents&task=icalrepeat.detail&evid=33&Itemid=1&year=2013&month=06&day=06&title
Meeting Description: Optimising the Human Factor in Translation: Facing the Technological Challenge
Rennes 2 University (France), June 6, 2013

In the 2011 ‘Optimale’ survey of the professional competences sought by translation industry employers across Europe, the ability to produce 100% quality translations was almost unanimously cited as the most important requirement. The ability to understand and use translation technologies, on the other hand, met with very different responses according to the type of technology and the type of company concerned. While three quarters of the respondents considered the ability to process and convert digital files or the use of translation memory systems to be important or essential, other translation-specific IT or IT-related skills did not rate as highly in the list of priorities. However, a significant minority did consider that machine translation (MT) post-editing, the ability to parameter DTP systems, or the ability to understand software or video-game localisation processes, were skills that applicants to the industry should possess. These contrasting results reflect the growing segmentation of the translation market, with widely differing demands and expectations being expressed by different translation users and providers.

Two years further on, this event will seek to gain further insights into the rapidly changing world of translation and will look at how university programmes training the next generation of translators are addressing the challenges these changes present.

Over the past decades, a great many conferences have been dedicated to the issue of translation technologies from the IT engineering or economic perspectives. This conference will focus on the changing technological paradigm from the academic trainers’ and translation employers’ perspectives. Among the questions it will seek to address are the following:

1. How can the value of human input in professional translation processes best be measured and assessed?
2. What is the overall impact of translation technologies on translation quality and quality control?
3. How is ‘invisible’, embedded machine translation affecting multilingual information and the perception and use of translation by the general public, journalists, students and academics outside the language community?
4. Beyond the hype: to what extent are MT and data-driven processes really making inroads in the translation market and what new business models are emerging?
5. What is the real impact of crowd-sourcing or other kinds of online collaborative translation on professional translation: are they really a threat and can they be put to good use as part of the training and learning process?
6. What are the emerging competence requirements generated by changing information environments and technologies?
7. What may be the impact of the new technological paradigm on traditional translation programme components such as domain-specific translation, terminology or revision?
8. Designing translator training programmes for the next five years: moving beyond CAT tools.
9. Training the trainers: how is the new technological paradigm affecting academic staff competence requirements?

Organising Committee:

Daniel Toudic (Rennes 2) (Chair)
Katell Hernandez-Morin (Rennes 2)
Kelly Falaise (Rennes 2)
Linguistic Subfield: Translation
Subject Language: None
LL Issue: 23.5361


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