LINGUIST List 10.1488

Fri Oct 8 1999

Books: Endangered Langs, Pragmatics

Editor for this issue: Scott Fults <scottlinguistlist.org>


Links to the websites of all LINGUIST's supporting publishers are available at the end of this issue.

Directory

  1. Nicholas Ostler, FEL III Proceedings available: Endangered Languages and Education
  2. LINCOM EUROPA, Pragmatics- Geluykens & Pelsmaekers (eds.) Professional Discourse
  3. LINCOM EUROPA, J. Baba, Interlanguage Pragmatics

Message 1: FEL III Proceedings available: Endangered Languages and Education

Date: Sun, 3 Oct 1999 12:11:52 +0100
From: Nicholas Ostler <nostlerchibcha.demon.co.uk>
Subject: FEL III Proceedings available: Endangered Languages and Education

The proceedings of the Foundation for Endangered Languages' last conference
in Maynooth are now available:

"Endangered Languages and Education"


It is an 128-page volume, and the contents look like this:

Index of Authors
Index of Languages and Families

Section 1	Setting the Scene

Nicholas Ostler
Foreword and Prospect: Endangered Languages and Education

David Bradley, May Bradley, Li Yongxiang
Language Maintenance of Endangered Languages in Central Yunnan, China


Section 2	Finding a Policy

Alesia Maltz, Dean Fox
To Set Tongues Wagging Again. Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara (N. Dakota)

Karen M Johnson-Weiner
Educating in English to Maintain German - Amish

R. McKenna Brown
Mayan Language Revitalization in Guatemala

Jon Todal
The Use of the Saami language in Norwegian schools (abstract)

Eugene McKendry
Policy and Irish in Northern Ireland Education (abstract)


Section 3	Looking at the Learners

Rachel Hoare
Breton in education in Brittany: passive and active expression of
attitudes

Winifred Crombie, Waldo Houia, Tamati Reedy
Language Proficiency Testing of Children in Maori Lang. Education

Leopoldina Araujo
Fire under Ashes: the Parkatj Indians� Self-Acknowledgment
(abstract)


Section 4	Working with Non-Written Languages

Blair A. Rudes, Francene Patterson
You Can't Say That in Tuscarora: Obstacles to Literacy in an Oral Language

Tony McEnery, Mabel Lie, Paul Baker and Mark Sebba
A Corpus of Spoken UK Sylheti

Vladimir Tourovski
On the use of computers for preserving endangered languages (abstract)


Section 5	Ways and Means	79

Diane Johnson, Ani Rolleston
Whaka piki reo: in-service provision for teachers of and through MSori

Joachim Pfaffe
The Ju/�hoan way of Making School (abstract)

Bojan Petek
Slovenian language in globalized educational arena (abstract)


Section 6	Role of Standard Dialects

Agurtzane Elordui
Disruption of language transmission among Basque dialects


Section 7	Impact and Future Prospects

Hasan Ouzzate
Dashing Amazigh Hopes to Language School Maintenance (abstract)

Andrejs Veisbergs
Latvian - from Endangered to Semi-restored Official Language (abstract)

Kathleen Tacelosky
Bilingual Education and Language among the Shipibo (Peru, Amazon)

Sheila M. Shannon
The role of All-Irish schools in the revival of the Irish language

Jeanette King
Lessons from Maori schooling experience - 13 years of immersion schools

Tapani Salminen
About the UNESCO Advisory Committee for Linguistic Pluralism and
Multilingual Education (abstract)


Foundation for Endangered Languages: Manifesto

Copies are now available, at 12 pounds UK apiece, or US$20 (including
surface postage and packing), from the address below. For air-mail
dispatch, please add 50%.

You can pay by
- a cheque (in � sterling) payable to �Foundation for Endangered
Languages�.
- a check (in US $) payable to �Nicholas Ostler�.
- proof of having sent an equivalent sum in your own currency to the
society�s account, �Foundation for Endangered Languages�, Account no:
50073456, The Cooperative Bank (Sort code: 08-90-02), 16 St. Stephen's
Street, Bristol BS1 1JR, England.
- or by credit card (Visa, MasterCard, EuroCard), enclosing Card number,
Expiry date (month | year), Name (as on card), and Address (as on card).


All proceeds which come in soon enough will go to support our next round of
grants (for which the Call for Applications went out two weeks ago).


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Message 2: Pragmatics- Geluykens & Pelsmaekers (eds.) Professional Discourse

Date: Mon, 04 Oct 1999 20:05:22 +0200
From: LINCOM EUROPA <Lincom.Europat-online.de>
Subject: Pragmatics- Geluykens & Pelsmaekers (eds.) Professional Discourse

R. GELUYKENS & K. PELSMAEKERS, EDS.
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From: LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de (LINCOM EUROPA)
Status: RO

DISCOURSE IN PROFESSIONAL CONTEXTS
R. GELUYKENS & K. PELSMAEKERS, EDS.

The papers in this collection are all concerned with a rather special
type of discourse: they deal with either spoken or written language
which was produced in what could be called an "institutional",
professional context.

Despite the growing interest within discourse pragmatics for language
produced within an institutional framework, existing publications tend
to concentrate either on one specific type of institutional setting
(e.g. business negotiations) or on one specific research tradition
(e.g. conversation analysis).

The present book is rather different in concept, in that the subject
matter is approached from a variety of functional research traditions
and methods, and in doing so cuts right across the spoken-written
distinction. First of all, the contributors scrutinize a variety of
discourse types, such as business interaction, business letters,
classroom talk, political interviews, press releases, and
pharmacist-patient interaction. Secondly, they show a variety of
research traditions and methods at work, including systemic-functional
linguistics, conversation analysis, social semiotics, ethnography, and
cognitive grammar. Thirdly, since institutional communication takes
place in various modes of speaking and writing, the present collection
includes work on discourse in such varied modes as face-to-face
interaction, media interviews, group interaction, news reports, and
letters.

This collection also offers an introductory overview of the field, as
well as a selective bibliography of past research on institutional
discourse, subdivided into seven major categories: business, medical,
legal, classroom, media, political, and scientific/acedemic. Elements
of all seven domains can, in various forms, be found in the present
volume.

ISBN 3 89586 613 X. 
LINCOM Studies in Prgamatics 03. 
Ca. 330pp. EUR 70.56 / USD 86.50 / DM 138 

Ordering information for individuals: Please give us your creditcard no.
/ expiry date or send us a cheque. Prices in this information include
shipment worldwide by airmail. A standing order for this series is
available with special discounts offered to individual subscribers. 

LINCOM EUROPA, Paul-Preuss-Str. 25, D-80995 Muenchen, Germany; FAX +4989
3148909; 
http://home.t-online.de/home/LINCOM.EUROPA
LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.
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Message 3: J. Baba, Interlanguage Pragmatics

Date: Mon, 04 Oct 1999 20:08:40 +0200
From: LINCOM EUROPA <LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de>
Subject: J. Baba, Interlanguage Pragmatics

INTERLANGUAGE PRAGMATICS
Compliment Reponses by Learners of
Japanese and English as a Second Language

JUNKO BABA
University of South Carolina, Columbia

The purpose of this study is to identify what sociolinguistic
variables are problematic for learners of Japanese and English as
second languages and how those variables may affect the types of
Compliment Responses (Crs) the learners choose in conversation.

To investigate interlanguage CRs, this study compares the learner data
with baseline data taken from native Japanese and American English
speakers. The sociolinguistic variables studied were the targets
(Family versus Self) and topics (External versus Internal) of
compliments. The variables were combined into four target-topic
categories: Family External, Family Internal, Self External, and Self
Internal. A total of 60 informants participated in the study, of
which 12 were American native speakers of English (AAs), 17 were
native speakers of Japanese (JJs), 14 were Japanese learners of
English (ESLs); and 17 were American learners of Japanese (JSLs). Each
informants had a 30- to 60-minute conversation session with a female
friend, or conversation leader, who was a native speaker of the
language in which the conversation was conducted. The data was
analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. All data was
tape-recorded, narrowly transcribed, and coded by politeness type. The
politeness types are those from Brown and Levinson's theory of
politeness: Positive Politeness, Negative Politeness, Off-Record, and
Do-not-Do-FTA (Face Threatening Act). In politeness type, the
compliment responses of the learners were found to approximate those
of the native speakers of the target languages. A detailed examination
of the sociolinguistic variables of CRs and the dispreferredness of
certain discourse structures, however, revealed that the learners use
pragmatic transfer from their L1 and overgeneralize politeness types
of their L2. The result of a chi-square test revealed that the use of
Negative Politeness in Family External CRs was most significantly
different across groups, whereas its use in Self External CRs was
found to be the most similar across groups. The family variable in
CRs was the most difficult for the learner groups, especially for the
JSLs, who are not familiar with using Negative Politeness when
responding to compliments about their family members.

The study also investigated the correlation between politeness type
and the intensity of the compliments and the correlation between
politeness type and the different sequences of complements and their
responses. Only among AAs did Positive Politeness CRs correlate with
the intensity of the compliments, while ESLs seemed to be bothered by
increased intensity.

ISBN 3 89586 622 9. 
LINCOM Studies in Pragmatics 04. 
Ca. 300pp. EUR 57.27 / USD 70 / DM 112 

Ordering information for individuals: Please give us your creditcard no.
/ expiry date or send us a cheque. Prices in this information include
shipment worldwide by airmail. A standing order for this series is
available with special discounts offered to individual subscribers. 

LINCOM EUROPA, Paul-Preuss-Str. 25, D-80995 Muenchen, Germany; FAX +4989
3148909; 
http://home.t-online.de/home/LINCOM.EUROPA
LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.
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