LINGUIST List 11.98

Tue Jan 18 2000

Books: History of Linguistics, Sociolinguistics

Editor for this issue: Scott Fults <scottlinguistlist.org>




Links to the websites of all LINGUIST's supporting publishers are available at the end of this issue.

Directory

  • Paul Peranteau, History of Linguistics, Volumes 1 & 2
  • Paul Peranteau, Socioling: Why We Curse: A Neuro-psycho-social Theory, T. Jay

    Message 1: History of Linguistics, Volumes 1 & 2

    Date: Tue, 18 Jan 2000 13:02:37 -0500
    From: Paul Peranteau <paulbenjamins.com>
    Subject: History of Linguistics, Volumes 1 & 2


    John Benjmains Publishing announces the publication of a new two-volume set in the History of Linguistics:

    History of Linguistics 1996, Volume 1. Traditions in Linguistics Worldwide. Selected papers from the Seventh International Conference on the History of the Language Sciences (ICHOLS VII), Oxford, 12-17 September 1996. CRAM, David, Andrew LINN and Elke NOWAK (eds.) Studies in the History of the Language Sciences 94 US & Canada: 1 55619 213 4 / USD 90.00 (Hardcover) Rest of world: 90 272 4582 7 / NLG 180.00 (Hardcover)

    The papers in this volume present a colourful picture of the range of research currently being undertaken in the field of the history of linguistics, with contribution both from established scholars and from younger researchers. The volume is organised on a geographical basis, with sections devoted to a number of different traditions in linguistics world-wide.

    The opening section is concerned with a number of general and methodological topics - ranging from the notion of 'revolution' in linguistic historiography to the history of the study of ape language - with contributions from Konrad Koerner, Peter Schmitter, Pieter A.M. Seuren, Talbot Taylor and Stuart Shanker. The second section is devoted to 'missionary linguistics', an umbrella category for the early contacts of Europeans with non-European languages. This section includes contributions from Cristina Altman, Manuel Breva-Claramonte, Lindsey Crickmay, Sabine Dedenbach-Salazar S�enz, Julia Falk, Beatriz Garza Cuar�n, John Joseph, Michael Mackert, Cristina Monz�n, Elke Nowak and Richard Steadman-Jones. Subsequent sections address individual traditions in linguistics. III. The Celtic Tradition: Daniel Davis, Eugene McKendry, Erich Poppe and Paul Russell. IV. The Chinese Tradition: Stephen Matthews. V. The Georgian Tradition: Nino D. Kemertelidze and Alexander Potskhishvili. VI. The Hebrew Tradition: Yaakov Gruntfest, [the late] David T�n�. VII. The Japanese Tradition: Tadao Shimomiya. VIII. The Persian Tradition: Mehdi Meshkatod Dini, �va M. Jeremi�s. IX. The Russian Tradition: Sylvie Archaimbault and Patrick S�riot. X. The Tamil Tradition: Jean-Luc Chevillard.

    History of Linguistics 1996, Volume 2. >From Classical to Contemporary Linguistics. Selected papers from the Seventh International Conference on the History of the Language Sciences (ICHOLS VII), Oxford, 12-17 September 1996. CRAM, David, Andrew LINN and Elke NOWAK (eds.) Studies in the History of the Language Sciences 95 US & Canada: 1 55619 214 2 / USD 95.00 (Hardcover) Rest of world: 90 272 4583 5 / NLG 190.00 (Hardcover)

    This volume contains papers on linguistic historiography ranging chronologically from ancient Greece to the present, and covering philosophical, social and political aspects of language as well as the study of grammar in the narrow sense. The work opens with the report on a round-table discussion of problems in translating ancient grammatical texts, which was chaired by Pierre Swiggers and Alfons Wouters, with John Joseph, Wilfried K�rschner, Jean Lallot and Dirk Schenkeveld as speakers. The remainder of the volume is arranged in chronological sections, with contributions as follows. II. Classical and Medieval: Mark Atherton, Don Chapman, Louis Kelly, Danilo Marcondes, Brian Merrilees and William Edwards, Eugen Munteanu, W. Keith Percival. III. Seventeenth Century: Werner H�llen, Michael Isermann, Jaap Maat, William McMahon, Judith Olszowy-Schlanger, Marijke van der Wal, Nick Wilding. IV. Eighteenth Century: Gerda Ha�ler, Matthew Lauzon, Andrew Linn, Jan Noordegraaf, Robin Smith. V. Nineteenth Century: Donata Chiric�, Matilde Gallardo, Mati Hint, Kurt Jankowsky, Joan Leopold, Brigitte Nerlich, Herman Seldeslachts and Pierre Swiggers, Frank Vonk. VI. Twentieth Century: T. Craig Christy, Els Elffers, B�atrice Godart-Wendling, Jacqueline L�on, Benigno Salgado, Frits Stuurman.

    John Benjamins Publishing Co. Offices: Philadelphia Amsterdam: Websites: http://www.benjamins.com http://www.benjamins.nl E-mail: servicebenjamins.com customer.servicesbenjamins.nl Phone: +215 836-1200 +31 20 6762325 Fax: +215 836-1204 +31 20 6739773

    Message 2: Socioling: Why We Curse: A Neuro-psycho-social Theory, T. Jay

    Date: Tue, 18 Jan 2000 13:08:12 -0500
    From: Paul Peranteau <paulbenjamins.com>
    Subject: Socioling: Why We Curse: A Neuro-psycho-social Theory, T. Jay


    John Benjamins Publishing announces the availability of this new work in Sociolinguistics:

    Why We Curse. A neuro-psycho-social theory of speech. JAY, Timothy US & Canada: 1 55619 758 6 / USD 35.00 (Hardcover) Rest of world: 90 272 2186 3 / NLG 70.00 (Hardcover) Psychiatrists, psychologists, neurologists, linguists and speech pathologists currently have no coherent theory to explain why we curse and why we choose the words we do when we curse. The Neuro-Psycho-Social Theory of Speech draws together information about cursing from different disciplines and unites them to explain and describe the psychological, neurological, cultural and linguistic factors that underlie this startling phenomenon.

    Why We Curse is divided into five parts. Part 1 introduces the dimensions and scope of cursing and outlines the NPS Theory, while Part 2 covers neurological variables and offers evidence for right brain dominance during emotional speech events. Part 3 then focuses on psychological development including language acquisition, personality development, cognition and so forth, while Part 4 covers the wide variety of social and cultural forces that define curse words and restrict their usage. Finally, Part 5 concludes by examining the social and legal implications of cursing, treating misconceptions about cursing, and setting the agenda for future research.

    The work draws on new research by Dr. Jay and others and continues the research reported in his groundbreaking 1992 volume "Cursing in America. A psycholinguistic study of dirty language in the courts, in the movies, in the schoolyards and on the streets".

    John Benjamins Publishing Co. Offices: Philadelphia Amsterdam: Websites: http://www.benjamins.com http://www.benjamins.nl E-mail: servicebenjamins.com customer.servicesbenjamins.nl Phone: +215 836-1200 +31 20 6762325 Fax: +215 836-1204 +31 20 6739773
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