LINGUIST List 12.1440

Tue May 29 2001

Qs: Derivational Loss/Contrast, Directional Verbs

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Directory

  1. Andy Wedel, Examples of Derivation-induced Loss of Contrast
  2. Olivier Mathiasin, directionnal verbs

Message 1: Examples of Derivation-induced Loss of Contrast

Date: Fri, 25 May 2001 09:42:39 -0700 (PDT)
From: Andy Wedel <wedelling.UCSC.EDU>
Subject: Examples of Derivation-induced Loss of Contrast

I'm looking for languages in which affixation can result in a loss of 
contrast to a particular value relative to the stem, for example if in 
some language a stem-final position supported a voicing, manner, or place 
contrast that were neutralized to a specific value across the board upon 
suffixation. A specific example might be nasal place assimilation in a 
language that has only coronal-initial suffixes, such that a potential 
stem-final contrast in place for nasals is neutralized to coronal upon 
suffixation. Alternatively, there might be a manner contrast in the 
feature [continuant] supported word-finally, but upon vowel-initial 
suffixation, stem-final stops might spirantize. I would be grateful for 
any responses or comments. Please email me at wedelling.ucsc.edu

Andrew Wedel
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Message 2: directionnal verbs

Date: Mon, 28 May 2001 10:09:49 +0200
From: Olivier Mathiasin <Olivier.Mathiasinetienne.univ-lyon2.fr>
Subject: directionnal verbs

hi everybody.

I'm new to this list and need some help with the whereabouts of the
"directionnal" term when it refers to traditionnal syntax of oral
languages. In fact, I'm trying to find out if the use of the term to
describe some verbs on signed language is motivated typologically by a
phenomenom attested in oral languages.

Thanks in advance,

Olivier.

PS: Please excuse any grammatical or orthographical 
mistake because i'm french.

Olivier MATHIASIN
Olivier.Mathiasinetu.univ-lyon2.fr
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