LINGUIST List 12.2113

Mon Aug 27 2001

Qs: CA & ATC, Letter Use

Editor for this issue: Dina Kapetangianni <dinalinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Paul A. Falzon, Posting: CA & ATC
  2. Bill Saidel, Letter Use within the English Language

Message 1: Posting: CA & ATC

Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2001 15:21:24 +0200
From: Paul A. Falzon <pfalzoncct.um.edu.mt>
Subject: Posting: CA & ATC


Hi Everybody,

I am carrying out what is essentially ethnomethodological conversation 
analytic research in the domain of air traffic control. I would be 
grateful to hear from anyone involved in, interested in, or 
knowledgeable about similar research (not necessarily from a CA 
perspective) in this domain. Apart from ATC-aircrew communications, I am 
also collecting audiovisual data on copresent ATC team communications 
(typically executive controller & planning controller) and audio data 
on physically distributed controller communications, i.e. between 
controllers located in adjacent ATC facilities & centres.

While my main aim is to treat technology supported/mediated human 
communication within the domain of ATC from a CA perspective, I am also 
interested in studying the language of ATC as a controlled language.

Thank you,
Paul

Paul A. Falzon
University of Malta

E-mail: pfalzoncct.um.edu.mt
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Message 2: Letter Use within the English Language

Date: Mon, 27 Aug 2001 13:33:25 -0400
From: Bill Saidel <saidelcamden.rutgers.edu>
Subject: Letter Use within the English Language

I'm looking for the frequency of letter use within the English language. I've
been able to find specific examples (ie., the distribution in Tale of Two
Cities or the Bible), but not a general answer. 

What is the accepted general answer to this question by people who study
language and how is that question asked such that it is general?

TIA,

Bill Saidel
Dept of Biology
Rutgers University-Camden Campus
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