LINGUIST List 12.546

Tue Feb 27 2001

Qs: Pragmatism/Structuralism, Case Gov't Outside IE

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Directory

  1. Dan Everett, American Pragmatism and American Structuralism
  2. Matthew Baerman, Case government outside of IE

Message 1: American Pragmatism and American Structuralism

Date: Mon, 26 Feb 2001 09:03:01 +0000 (GMT)
From: Dan Everett <Dan.Everettman.ac.uk>
Subject: American Pragmatism and American Structuralism

I am looking for any sources on possible influences of the philosophical
work of American Pragmatists (especially William James, C.S. Peirce, and
John Dewey) on American Structuralism and American Descriptive
Linguistics. Please respond to Dan.Everettman.ac.uk If there are
sufficient responses, I will post a summary.

Thanks,

Dan Everett
Research Professor of Phonetics and Phonology
University of Manchester
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Message 2: Case government outside of IE

Date: Tue, 27 Feb 2001 09:58:23 +0000
From: Matthew Baerman <m.baermansurrey.ac.uk>
Subject: Case government outside of IE


Dear Linguist List readers
I am looking for examples in non Indo-European languages of case government
by verbs or adpositions that is not semantically transparent. In IE
languages it is not uncommon that a given verb assigns some case other than
the canonical object case, or that the case governed by prepositions must
be lexically specified. Though some hint of an original semantic motivation
may be recoverable, the matter is ultimately decided in the lexical
representation of the verb/adposition. My impression is that this doesn't
happen outside of IE. That is, where you do get different cases being
selected by verbs/adpositions it is either semantically transparent, or
follows from general rules of syntax (e.g. adpositions transparently
derived from nouns take the default adnominal case). Is this a hasty
conclusion? The only study I know of to address the matter directly is
Johanna Nichols, 1983, "On direct and oblique cases" (proceedings of the
BLS 9, pp. 170-192). I would appreciate any tips, either in the form of
examples or bibliographic references.



Matthew Baerman
Surrey Morphology Group
Dept. of Linguistic & International Studies
University of Surrey
Guildford, Surrey GU2 5XH
United Kingdom

e-mail: m.baermansurrey.ac.uk
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