LINGUIST List 12.728

Fri Mar 16 2001

Qs: Teaching Blind L2/L3, Asian Lang Acquistion

Editor for this issue: Karen Milligan <karenlinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. beate luo, mainstreaming blind students in a foreign language class.
  2. Scott McGinnis, Asian (Chinese, Japanese and Korean) language heritage learner research

Message 1: mainstreaming blind students in a foreign language class.

Date: Fri, 16 Mar 2001 10:52:03 +0800
From: beate luo <beatefcu.edu.tw>
Subject: mainstreaming blind students in a foreign language class.





 I am interested in any references that you could provide on teaching
a blind student foreign languages in a mainstream classroom. The
student concerned is an English Lang major and German Lang minor at
Feng-Chia University. Neither language is her first language. We don't
have a lot of experience how to help her better to follow in class.

Therefore, any kind of feedback will be greatly appreciated. If
you know of someone who does not subscribe to this list who could
contribute, please, pass this on to him or her. Thanks,

 Beate Luo
Feng-Chia University
Foreign Lanuage and Literature Teaching Section
Dept. of Humanities
100 Wen-Hua Rd.
Hsi-Tun District, 407
Taichung City
Taiwan, ROC
e-mail: beatefcu.edu.tw



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Message 2: Asian (Chinese, Japanese and Korean) language heritage learner research

Date: Thu, 15 Mar 2001 11:11:16 -0500
From: Scott McGinnis <smcginnisnflc.org>
Subject: Asian (Chinese, Japanese and Korean) language heritage learner research

Please respond directly to the originator of this inquiry --
jeffreyhawaii.edu

	We are looking for studies that have looked into linguistic
and psycholinguistic learning trends exhibited by heritage learners
that may suggest differences in the way they are acquiring the
language as compared with non-native learners. We are looking for
"solid" research involving "informants", as differentiated from policy
or field review papers.

	Below are a few articles that I have been able to dig up so far.

Please do not let the list fool you as it contains mostly the type of
articles we are NOT looking for, but which do provide insight into the
logistical issues related to accomodation of heritage learners. If
any such research related to either Japanese or Korean comes to mind,
perhaps you could mention that as well?

	I thank you in advance for any leads you can provide. Best
regards,


					Jeffrey


			 Jeffrey J. Hayden
			 (�����/���s�s)

Department of East Asian				 Moore Hall
382
Languages and Literatures			 1890 East-West
Road
University of Hawai'i at Manoa			 Honolulu, HI
96822

eFax: 413 - 487 - 0389

jeffreyHawaii.Edu			 http://www2.hawaii.edu/~jeffrey


References (Somewhat) Related to Heritage Learners of Chinese

Gallagher, M. W. (1999). Special curricula for English-speaking
learners
at Chinese community schools. In M. Chu (Ed.), Mapping the course of
the
Chinese language field: Chinese Language Teachers Association Monograph
#3
(pp. 313-330). Kalamazoo, MI: Chinese Language Teachers Association.

Kotenbeutel, C. (1999). National standards for foreign language
teaching: The Chinese connection. In M. Chu (Ed.), Mapping the course
of
the Chinese language field: Chinese Language Teachers Association
Monograph #3 (pp. 257-270). Kalamazoo, MI: Chinese Language Teachers
Association.

Walker, G. L. R. (1996). Designing an intensive Chinese curriculum.
In
S. McGinnis (Ed.), Chinese pedagogy: An emerging field. Chinese
Language
Teachers Association Monograph #2 (pp. 181-227). Columbus, OH: Foreign
Language Publications.

Walton, A. R. (1996). Reinventing language fields: The Chinese case.

In S. McGinnis (Ed.), Chinese pedagogy: An emerging field. Chinese
Language Teachers Association Monograph #2 (pp. 29-80). Columbus, OH: 
Foreign Language Publications.

Wang, S.-H. C. (1999). Teacher training: Meeting the needs of the
field. In M. Chu (Ed.), Mapping the course of the Chinese language
field: 
Chinese Language Teachers Association Monograph #3 (pp. 25-38). 
Kalamazoo, MI: Chinese Language Teachers Association.

Wen, X.-H. (1999). Chinese language learning motivation: A
comparative
study of different ethnic groups. In M. Chu (Ed.), Mapping the course
of
the Chinese language field: Chinese Language Teachers Association
Monograph #3 (pp. 121-150). Kalamazoo, MI: Chinese Language Teachers
Association.
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