LINGUIST List 12.817

Fri Mar 23 2001

Qs: Ancient Chinese Taboo Words, Tokenization Ref

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  1. Gabriele Bugada, Ancient Chinese taboo words
  2. Maite Taboada, tokenization reference

Message 1: Ancient Chinese taboo words

Date: Wed, 21 Mar 2001 14:31:29 +0100
From: Gabriele Bugada <nocteshotmail.com>
Subject: Ancient Chinese taboo words

I am an italian student taking a course of Sociolinguistics. I need
some informations about words which in ancient Chinese dialects were
considered taboo not just for their common-use meaning, but because
their pronunciation contained taboo words, exp. with sexual
meaning. E.g., I heard that there was a taboo word which meant an
animal but whose pronunciation was 'composed' by sounds meaning penis
and omosexual. I would like to know if this is true, what word (and
meaning what animal) was implied, and if other examples are known.
Can anyone help me? 

Thank you in advance.
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Message 2: tokenization reference

Date: Fri, 23 Mar 2001 13:04:43 -0800
From: Maite Taboada <maitemindfuleye.com>
Subject: tokenization reference

I'm looking for references on how to do tokenization from scratch
(separate a stream into words, numbers, punctuation signs). I don't
want to have to explain the whole process, so I thought I'd just say
"we use a standard procedure, such as the one described in X".

Can anyone help me find appropriate references?

Thanks a lot,

- Maite

____
Maite Taboada, Senior Computational Linguist
MindfulEye.com Systems Inc.
http://www.MindfulEye.com 
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