LINGUIST List 12.992

Mon Apr 9 2001

Qs: EFL/Children's Literature, Objects/Front & Back

Editor for this issue: Karen Milligan <karenlinguistlist.org>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. Sedat �avdar, CHILDRENS' LITERATURE IN EFL
  2. Bill Palmer, Objects with a front and a back.

Message 1: CHILDRENS' LITERATURE IN EFL

Date: Mon, 09 Apr 2001 18:11:07
From: Sedat �avdar <sedat03hotmail.com>
Subject: CHILDRENS' LITERATURE IN EFL



Dear Linguists,

I am Sedat Cavdar, an English Teacher from Turkey. I reached to your address 
on a web site. I am working on a thesis about using Childrens' Literature 
in language teaching. I kindly request you to inform if any resources for 
related articles on the net and I will be appreciated with your ideas.

Best Regards,

Sedat Cavdar

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Message 2: Objects with a front and a back.

Date: Tue, 10 Apr 2001 11:43:56 +1000
From: Bill Palmer <palmer_billhotmail.com>
Subject: Objects with a front and a back.



Dear listers

I'm currently looking for data on the way languages talk about notions like 
'in front of' and 'behind' (or 'in back of'), and left/right.

I have read that in some Nilotic languages trees are treated as having an 
intrinsic front and back. (The front is the side the tree leans away from.) 
I have also read that in some languages objects like nails and peanuts are 
treated as having intrinsic fronts and backs. (The pointed end of a nail and 
the smaller end of a peanut are the fronts.) Unfortunately I no longer have 
the relevant references.

I'm keen to here about languages that assign front and back to objects that 
aren't assigned them in English.

Conversely, I'm keen to hear about languages that don't assign front/back to 
objects that English does.

I'd also be grateful for any references on this kind of variation.

I'll post a summary.


Bill Palmer
Fellow
Dep't Linguistics and Applied Linguistics
University of Melbourne
palmer_billhotmail.com



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