LINGUIST List 15.3046

Tue Oct 26 2004

Diss: Historical Ling: Hrafnbjargarson: 'Oblique...'

Editor for this issue: Takako Matsui <takolinguistlist.org>


Directory


        1.    Gunnar Hrafn Hrafnbjargarson, Oblique Subjects and Stylistic Fronting in the History of Scandinavian and English: The Role of IP-Spec



Message 1: Oblique Subjects and Stylistic Fronting in the History of Scandinavian and English: The Role of IP-Spec

Date: 25-Oct-2004
From: Gunnar Hrafn Hrafnbjargarson <g.h.hrafnbjargarsonilf.uio.no>
Subject: Oblique Subjects and Stylistic Fronting in the History of Scandinavian and English: The Role of IP-Spec


Institution: University of Aarhus
 Program: Scandinavian Institute 
 Dissertation Status: Completed 
 Degree Date: 2004 
 
 Author: Gunnar Hrafn Hrafnbjargarson
 
 Dissertation Title: Oblique Subjects and Stylistic Fronting in the History of
 Scandinavian and English: The Role of IP-Spec 
 
 Dissertation URL: http://folk.uio.no/gunnahh/phd/
 
 Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics; Syntax 
 
 Subject Language(s):
 Danish (Code: DNS) 
 English (Code: ENG) 
 Icelandic (Code: ICE) 
 
 Language Family(ies):
 North Germanic 
 
 Dissertation Director(s):
 Sten Vikner
 Henrik Jørgensen
 
 Dissertation Abstract:
 
 The central issue that is discussed in this study is the morphosyntactic 
 development of Danish, Faroese, Icelandic, Norwegian, Swedish, and 
 English, namely the loss of morphological case and the loss of V°-to-I° 
 movement and stylistic fronting, with a focus on the role of IP-Spec.
 
 The synchronic part of the study deals with two different constructions 
 in present-day Icelandic. Firstly, it focuses on the analysis of 
 constructions with dative subjects and nominative objects, i.e. the 
 agreement relation between a verb and a nominative DP and how to 
 account for the fact that oblique subjects cannot be inanimate and that 
 nominative objects cannot be first or second person. Secondly, it 
 provides an analysis of stylistic fronting. 
 
 The diachronic part of the study also focuses on the two constructions 
 as there is a focus on showing that the older Scandinavian languages 
 and English had dative subjects and that stylistic fronting existed in 
 Old and Middle Danish. Furthermore, the aim of the study is to show 
 that the loss of constructions with dative subjects and nominative 
 objects followed a systematic process in these languages.
 
 The two theoretical frameworks used in the thesis are Optimality 
 Theory and the Minimalist Program.
Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue