LINGUIST List 2.485

Tue 10 Sep 1991

Qs: Discourse, Allegro, Hansard, Genitive, Cuneiform, Professeure

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. , Re: Queries
  2. , Allegro Common LISP and Foreign Characters
  3. Gregory Grefenstette, The Hansards
  4. BROADWELL GEORGE AARON, the book that's cover ...
  5. Alexis Manaster Ramer, Ossetic (Ossetian?)
  6. Dennis Baron, professeure/madelle
  7. Edward Kovach, cunniform scanner
  8. William J. Rapaport, Re: Professeure/470

Message 1: Re: Queries

Date: Wed, 04 Sep 91 14:47:53 BST
From: <WHEATLJSibm3090.computer-centre.birmingham.ac.uk>
Subject: Re: Queries
In Discourse analysis Birmingham UK style - when is a response an R
move or an F move.
eg
I (el) Can we move on to the next point
R/F yes of course
Is the granting of permissin here a sort of feedback/ follow up
or is it response move. This ought to be basic but the categories
are not clear cut I find.
Is ayone else out there usng Disc Analysis - or
any more rigorous system than conversation analysis
Looking forward to a response!
john
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Message 2: Allegro Common LISP and Foreign Characters

Date: Mon, 9 Sep 91 13:33 GMT
From: <FARGHALYauc.eg>
Subject: Allegro Common LISP and Foreign Characters
I have been trying to get Allegro Common LISP to process Arabic texts
without much success. Is it impossible for Allegro Commpn LISP to process
non Roman characters? Has anybody tried doing that? Does anyone have suggestions
 that might work?
please send replies to FarghalyAUC.EG
Ali Farghaly, The American University
Thanks.
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Message 3: The Hansards

Date: Mon, 9 Sep 91 15:13:50 -0400
From: Gregory Grefenstette <grefencs.pitt.edu>
Subject: The Hansards
A recent listing in the LINGUIST spoke of The Hansards
(bilingual transcripts of the Canadian Parliament debates)
currently available through the ACL/DCI.
and then said to contact the ACL/DCI.
Does anyone know the e-mail coordinates of this contact?
--Gregory Grefenstette
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Message 4: the book that's cover ...

Date: Mon, 9 Sep 91 16:56:42 -0400
From: BROADWELL GEORGE AARON <gb661csc.albany.edu>
Subject: the book that's cover ...
I was talking to my class the other day, and mentioned that we only have
one genitive relative pronoun in English -- whose, and that we use it
for both animates and inanimates (even though the interrogative version
is restricted to animates -- oops, make that humans and non-humans).
I gave as an example `The book whose cover is red is about syntax.'
One of my students objected that this was incorrect, that one
ought to say `The book that's cover is red ...'
I'm not sure that I've ever heard this before. Could other people
tell me if there are other speakers who use this construction.
Or was my student engaging in hypercorrection?
Clearly, this is not standard English. But I would be interested in
hearing whether this is okay for others.
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Message 5: Ossetic (Ossetian?)

Date: Tue, 10 Sep 91 11:16:56 EDT
From: Alexis Manaster Ramer <USERGDD8WAYNEMTS.BITNET>
Subject: Ossetic (Ossetian?)
Does anybody know a speaker of or an expert on the Iranian language of
the USSR whose name in English is either Ossetic or Ossetian or something
like that?
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Message 6: professeure/madelle

Date: Tue, 10 Sep 1991 10:02:43 -0500
From: Dennis Baron <baronux1.cso.uiuc.edu>
Subject: professeure/madelle
I've been following the _professeurE_ discussion with interest. Earlier
this year someone on another discussion group mentioned coming across
a French term, _madelle_, designed to function like English _Ms._ But
I haven't been able to get any information on it. Does anyone out
there know about the origin or use of this term?
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Message 7: cunniform scanner

Date: Tue, 10 Sep 91 14:33:02 CDT
From: Edward Kovach <kovachaustin.cogsci.uiuc.edu>
Subject: cunniform scanner
A professor of Religious Studies needs a Scanner
which is capable of reading cunniform texts directly
off clay tablets. Since the tablets are in the Near East
the scanner needs to be portable. Does such a
scanner exists? If so, where could one get one?
Please respond directly to me or to the following address:
hermesux1.cso.uiuc.edu
Thanks,
Ed Kovach
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Message 8: Re: Professeure/470

Date: Tue, 10 Sep 91 12:38:22 EDT
From: William J. Rapaport <rapaportcs.Buffalo.EDU>
Subject: Re: Professeure/470
Hasn't it struck (stricken?) anyone as odd that in Canadian French, it's
a sign of feminism to create feminine nouns (professeur/e) while in English
it's considered a sign of feminism to do away with them (actress -> actor,
etc.)? Probably has to do with languages with nouns marked by gender vs.
those without?
			William J. Rapaport
			Associate Professor of Computer Science
			Center for Cognitive Science
Dept. of Computer Science||internet: rapaportcs.buffalo.edu
SUNY Buffalo		 ||bitnet: rapaportsunybcs.bitnet
Buffalo, NY 14260	 ||uucp: {rutgers,uunet}!cs.buffalo.edu!rapaport
(716) 636-3193, 3180 ||fax: (716) 636-3464
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