* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
LINGUIST List logo Eastern Michigan University Wayne State University *
* People & Organizations * Jobs * Calls & Conferences * Publications * Language Resources * Text & Computer Tools * Teaching & Learning * Mailing Lists * Search *
* *
LINGUIST List 21.3621

Tue Sep 14 2010

Diss: Comp Ling/Morphology/Syntax: Faaß: 'A Morpho-Syntactic ...'

Editor for this issue: Mfon Udoinyang <mfonlinguistlist.org>


To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.cfm.
Directory
        1.    Gertrud Faaß, A Morpho-Syntactic Description of Northern Sotho as a Basis for an Automated Translation from Northern Sotho to English

Message 1: A Morpho-Syntactic Description of Northern Sotho as a Basis for an Automated Translation from Northern Sotho to English
Date: 13-Sep-2010
From: Gertrud Faaß <gertrud.faaszims.uni-stuttgart.de>
Subject: A Morpho-Syntactic Description of Northern Sotho as a Basis for an Automated Translation from Northern Sotho to English
E-mail this message to a friend

Institution: University of Pretoria
Program: Department of African Languages
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2010

Author: Gertrud Faaß

Dissertation Title: A Morpho-Syntactic Description of Northern Sotho as a Basis for an Automated Translation from Northern Sotho to English

Dissertation URL: http://www.ims.uni-stuttgart.de/~faaszgd/PhD-thesis.html

Linguistic Field(s): Computational Linguistics
                            Morphology
                            Syntax

Subject Language(s): Sotho, Northern (nso)

Dissertation Director:
Ulrich Heid
Danie Jacobus Prinsloo

Dissertation Abstract:

This PhD thesis provides a morpho-syntactic description of Northern Sotho
from a computational perspective. While a number of publications describe
morphological and syntactical aspects of this language, mostly in the form
of prescriptive study books (e.g. Lombard (1985); Van Wyk et al. (1992);
Poulos and Louwrens (1994)) or of descriptive articles (e.g. Anderson and
Kotzé (2006); Kosch (2006); De Schryver and Taljard (2006)), so far no
comprehensive description is available that would provide a basis for
developing a rule-based parser to analyse Northern Sotho on sentence level.
This study attempts to fill the gap.

Northern Sotho morpho-syntactic phenomena are explored which results in the
following descriptions: Language units (tokens) of Northern Sotho are
identified. These are sorted into word class categories (parts of speech),
using the descriptions of Taljard et al. (2008) as a basis; the formal
relationships between these units are described in the form of productive
morpho-syntactic phrase grammar rules. These rules are defined within the
framework of generative grammar. Additionally, an attempt is made to find
generalisations on the contextual distribution of the many items contained
in verbs that are polysemous in terms of their parts of speech.

The grammar rules described in the preceding chapter are now explored in
order to find patterns in the co-occurrence of parts of speech leading
towards a future, more general linguistic modelling of Northern Sotho
verbs. It is also shown how a parser could work its way step-by-step doing
an analysis of a complete sentence making use of a lexicon and the rules
developed here. A number of relevant phrase grammar rules have also been
implemented as a constraint-based grammar fragment, in line with the theory
of Lexical-Functional Grammar (LFG, Kaplan and Bresnan, 1982). Here, we
utilized the Xerox Linguistic Environment (XLE) (with permission from the
Xerox Palo Alto Research Centre (PARC).

Lastly, the study contains some basic definitions for a proposed machine
translation (MT) into English attempting to support the development of
MT-rules. An introduction to MT and a first contrastive description of
phenomena of both languages is provided.



Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue



Page Updated: 14-Sep-2010

Supported in part by the National Science Foundation       About LINGUIST    |   Contact Us       ILIT Logo
While the LINGUIST List makes every effort to ensure the linguistic relevance of sites listed on its pages, it cannot vouch for their contents.