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LINGUIST List 21.3673

Fri Sep 17 2010

FYI: Call for Papers: Collected Volume ITA Development

Editor for this issue: Elyssa Winzeler <elyssalinguistlist.org>


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        1.    Greta Gorsuch, Call for Papers: Collected Volume ITA Development

Message 1: Call for Papers: Collected Volume ITA Development
Date: 16-Sep-2010
From: Greta Gorsuch <greta.gorsuchttu.edu>
Subject: Call for Papers: Collected Volume ITA Development
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Second Call for Papers
Working Theories for Teaching Assistant and International Teaching
Assistant Development

Attention: Second Language Acquisition Specialists with an interest in
advanced level learners

What Working Theories Will Do

This will be an edited, collected volume showcasing established and
emerging scholars in the field of Teaching Assistant (TA) and
International Teaching Assistant (ITA) education. Working Theories
goes beyond reporting good practices or program descriptions, which
typically comprises many books on TA and ITA development. Instead,
Working Theories places time-tested, robust theories, frameworks, and
models of TA and ITA learning and development at the center of
graduate student education by providing a scholarly venue for
description, explication, and application of these theories. In turn, these
theories and models from psychology, sociology, pedagogy, discourse
analysis, and second language learning will be presented in such as
way as to inform good practice, but above all, motivate future research.

General Description of Chapters Sought

Chapters in this volume can be methodologically rigorous empirical
studies or principled commentaries (although data-driven, empirical
studies are preferred), with approachable, detailed descriptions of the
rationale for the work, and the theory or model the work is based on.
Descriptions of good practices, program descriptions or evaluations, or
lesson plans are not appropriate for this volume. The word limit is
12,000. Abstracts will be due November 15, 2010 with full manuscripts
due by July 15, 2011. Style guideline will be APA. Electronic
submissions are encouraged: greta.gorsuchttu.edu

Chapters will be edited by an in-house editor in addition to the volume
editor. Thus this volume will be fully refereed and of high quality, and
will be published as a book by New Forums Press, Inc., Stillwater,
Oklahoma (USA), www.newforums.com

Volume Editor

Greta Gorsuch is an Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics &
Second Language Studies at Texas Tech University, and has
researched educational programs and ITA education for ten years. Her
publications have appeared in English for Specific Purposes, Journal of
Faculty Development, The Journal of Graduate Teaching Assistant
Development, and Education Policy Analysis Archives, among others.
She edited The Language Teacher (The Japan Association of
Language Teaching) and has guest edited special issues of System
and TESL-EJ.

Please submit your abstracts to her at: greta.gorsuchttu.edu

Project Overview

Teaching Assistant (TA) and International Teaching Assistant (ITA)
development remains an all-important field of inquiry in higher
education, both for practical and theoretical reasons. This collected
volume places time-tested, robust theories, frameworks, and models of
TA and ITA learning and development at the center of graduate
student education by providing a scholarly venue for description,
explication, and application of these theories and models. In turn, these
models from psychology, sociology, pedagogy, discourse analysis, and
second language learning will be presented in such as way as to inform
good practice, but above all, motivate future research.

In terms of practical considerations, American higher education
continues to be one of the largest and most developed education
systems in the world. It remains one of the few settings globally in
which individuals can obtain graduate degrees with the expectation of
being supported through teaching assistantships. The majority of U.S.
undergraduates receive direct instruction from American and
international graduate student/teaching assistants, who in the process
learn to teach within their content areas, and gain critical foundations
for their professional identity. And, an increasing number of
international graduate students from China, Korea, and India are
teaching U.S. undergraduates chemistry, physics, math, and business,
using their second or third languages to do so. In a simple, practical
sense, the continued success of American higher education depends
on effective development of TAs and ITAs, whether these efforts are
informal and apprentice-like, or formal and achieved through organized
programs.

Principled study of TA development presents rich ground for theoretical
reasons as well. Partly due to age and partly due to circumstance,
graduate students, as teaching assistants, stand at a crossroads of
deeply personal choices about learning, identity, vocation, and social
standing not only within an institutional culture but within a global
economy. For ITAs these choices are further mediated by their past
English language education experiences, by the current linguistic
demands of classroom communication, and by a future constrained by
second language learning processes which are slow, yet dynamic.
Given this, how do individuals learn how to be teachers? What steps
do they take to organize content for the purpose of instruction? How do
they learn to know what the institution they belong to expects of them?
What is involved in learning the norms of communication within specific
settings? How do second language learning processes operate within
advanced level learners? What areas of language are learned at late
stages, and how? What are the ways in which individuals negotiate
new personal and cultural identities in compelling, normative
circumstances? TAs and ITAs as a population can provide answers to
many of these questions.

What Makes this Book Different and how it will Contribute

This edited, collected volume will bring together established and
emerging scholars doing applied, theoretically grounded research in
TA and ITA education. The overarching goal of the volume is to plot
and guide research efforts and practice in TA and ITA education for the
next 20 years, and thus deepen the professional base of the field. TA
and ITA education should be recognized as a viable field of research,
and attract doctoral students and established scholars who will come to
specialize in these areas.

Publisher

New Forums Press, Inc.
Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA
www.newforums.com

Linguistic Field(s): Applied Linguistics

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