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LINGUIST List 21.3749

Thu Sep 23 2010

Calls: Applied Ling, Pragmatics, Translation/United Kingdom

Editor for this issue: Di Wdzenczny <dilinguistlist.org>


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        1.    Laura Gavioli, Exploring Participants' Orientation in Interpreter-mediated Interaction

Message 1: Exploring Participants' Orientation in Interpreter-mediated Interaction
Date: 21-Sep-2010
From: Laura Gavioli <laura.gavioliunimore.it>
Subject: Exploring Participants' Orientation in Interpreter-mediated Interaction
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Full Title: Exploring Participants' Orientation in Interpreter-mediated
Interaction

Date: 03-Jul-2010 - 08-Jul-2010
Location: Manchester, United Kingdom
Contact Person: Laura Gavioli
Meeting Email: laura.gavioliunimore.it

Linguistic Field(s): Applied Linguistics; Pragmatics; Translation

Call Deadline: 15-Oct-2010

Meeting Description:

Exploring participants' orientation in interpreter-mediated interaction

Proposing team: Laura Gavioli (Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Italy),
Bernd Meyer (Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz Germany), Cecilia
Wadensjö (Stockholm University, Sweden)

This panel aims to discuss the ways in which participants involved in
interpreter-mediated, face-to-face interaction - for short: dialogue
interpreting - orient to the sequential, situational and institutional frames
of the ongoing encounter; how interaction is managed and organized locally
between people speaking different languages, assisted by a third party
speaking both. In an increasingly 'globalized' world, this type of
communication seems potentially attractive in studies of linguistic
pragmatics.

When monolingual speakers interact in a first language setting, it is taken
for granted that they share knowledge of what is going on. In the case of
foreign language interaction, it may not be clear from the outset in whose
frame (or frames) a given encounter operates. However, if participants in
these kinds of settings are able to interact at some level of mutual
understanding, it must be possible to analyze how they are doing this.

In dialogue interpreted encounters, two out of three participants as a rule
have no or limited knowledge of another party's language and consequently
would normally not be able to understand, without the interpreter's
assistance, either what this party's talk is about, or how the shared event is
locally organized. Nevertheless, at some level, they share knowledge of
what is going on as interaction unfolds.

As is demonstrated in numerous empirical studies, when an interpreter is
introduced in a face-to-face communicative situation the organizational
format of interaction becomes fundamentally different from a dyadic, one-
language situation. It has been firmly established that interpreters,
irrespective of their educational background as interpreters (or lack thereof)
involve in a number of activities apart from translating others' talk (e.g.
asking for clarification, asking to stop and let the interpreter translate,
asking to repeat, explaining, clarifying). Conversely, it can be seen that the
communicative behaviour of all participants in an interpreted encounter has
an impact on how it is shaped and understood.

We encourage research looking at dialogue interpreting in various settings
(healthcare and migration institutions, courts, educational institutions, job
and media interviews and so forth) and invite studies applying Conversation
Analysis, Interactional Sociolinguistics, and other approaches based on the
study of talk in and as interaction. Research should be based on naturally
occurring, recorded and transcribed data sets.

Call for Papers

IPRA panel: Exploring participants' orientation in interpreter-mediated
interaction

We invite contributions focusing on research on interpreter-mediated
interaction in various settings (e.g. healthcare and migration institutions,
courts, educational institutions, job and media interviews) and are interested
in studies applying Conversation Analysis, Interactional Sociolinguistics, and
other approaches based on the study of talk in and as interaction. Research
should be based on naturally occurring, recorded and transcribed data sets.

Some contributions have already been sent in, but we would like to invite
one or two more.

Abstracts (not exceeding 500 words) should be sent by 15th October 2010
as an email attachment to:
Laura Gavioli
laura.gavioliunimore.it

Additional information:
Please note that:
- if accepted, abstracts will have to be submitted via IPrA conference site
before 29 October 2010, following the instructions available at
http://ipra.ua.ac.be/main.aspx?c=.CONFERENCE12&n=1403
- submitting the abstracts in accordance with the general guidelines is the
individual responsibility of contributor(s)
- IPrA membership is required for the submission of abstract and for
participation in the conference


Laura Gavioli (Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Italy),
Bernd Meyer (Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz Germany),
Cecilia Wadensjö (Stockholm University, Sweden)
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