LINGUIST List 27.591

Mon Feb 01 2016

Confs: Historical Ling, Ling Theories, Phonology, Syntax, Typology/Netherlands

Editor for this issue: Anna White <awhitelinguistlist.org>


Date: 01-Feb-2016
From: Nina Ouddeken <nina.ouddekenmeertens.knaw.nl>
Subject: Dealing with Bad Data in Linguistic Theory
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Dealing with Bad Data in Linguistic Theory
Short Title: DBD 2016


Date: 17-Mar-2016 - 18-Mar-2016
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Contact: Edoardo Cavirani
Contact Email: < click here to access email >
Meeting URL: http://www.meertens.knaw.nl/baddata/

Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics; Linguistic Theories; Phonology; Psycholinguistics; Sociolinguistics; Syntax; Typology

Meeting Description:

In recent years, linguistic theory has significantly expanded its empirical scope. If it has indeed ever been true that theories were built exclusively on the researcher’s own armchair judgments, such is definitely no longer the case. More and more, researchers have turned their attention to databases and corpora of all kinds, to experimental results, and to many other types of data sources. This development went hand in hand with an expansion of the scope of the theories, and collaborations with e.g. historical linguistics, dialectologists, and psycholinguists.

We believe that this is a positive development; but we also believe that some issues have not been sufficiently discussed. In this workshop we aim to tackle the issue of how to deal with ‘bad data’: many data that we have to deal with has not been collected with exactly the questions in mind that we want to ask. E.g., we have to use the results of a dialect survey of a few decades ago as the money is lacking to set up a new survey; or certain data are simply lacking for a particular historical period.

Please register before March 1 on the conference website (http://www.meertens.knaw.nl/baddata/). The registration fee (€ 25,--) should be paid on the first day of the workshop (coffee, tea and lunch on both days included). Please note that there is only a limited number of places available.

Invited Speakers:

Carson Schütze (University of California, Los Angeles)
Cecilia Poletto (Goethe Universität Frankfurt am Main)
Charles Yang (University of Pennsylvania)
Christina Tortora (The City University of New York)
Jeroen van Craenenbroeck (KU Leuven)
Joel Wallenberg (Newcastle University)
Keren Rice (University of Toronto)
Paul de Lacy (Rutgers University)
Paul Kiparsky (Stanford University)
Paula Fikkert (Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen)

Program:

Thursday March 17, 2016

9:00 – 9:55
Paul Kiparsky (Stanford University)
To be announced

9:55 – 10:50
Paul de Lacy (Rutgers University)
The evidentiary enterprise

10:50 – 11:20 Break

11:20 – 11:55
Tjong Kim Sang (Meertens Instituut)
Dealing with Bad Data Problems of the SAND

11:55 – 12:50
Jeroen van Craenenbroeck (KU Leuven)
Handle your verb clusters with care

12:50 -14:00 Lunch

14:00 – 14:55
Joel Wallenberg (Newcastle University)
On Very Slow Change: The decline of relative clause extraposition

14:55 – 15:30
Henri Kauhanen (University of Manchester) & George Walkden (University of Manchester)
Signal or noise? Biases, interactions and the Constant Rate Effect

15:30 – 15:55 Break

15:55 – 16:30
Grant Goodall (University of California, San Diego)
When data collide: A case study of traditional judgments vs. formal experiments in sentence acceptability

16:30 – 17:05
Norbert Corver (Universiteit Utrecht), Marjo van Koppen (Universiteit Utrecht) & Jolien Scholten (Universiteit Utrecht)
Are(n’t) my data compatible with those? Some methodological issues in the micro-comparative study of pronominals and demonstratives

17:05 – 18:00
Cecilia Poletto (Goethe Universität Frankfurt am Main)
Are big data always bad data? How to make your best with incomplete data


Friday March 18, 2016

9:00 – 9:55
Keren Rice (University of Toronto)
Bad data, incomplete data, and inappropriate data: A view from fieldwork

9:55- 10:50
Carson Schutze (University of California, Los Angeles)
Crowdsourcing is not a Panacea for Judgment Collection

10:50 – 11:20 Break

11:20 – 11:55
Isaac Gould (The University of Kansas)
When Judgments are Insufficient: An Evaluation Metric for Syntactic Theory

11:55-12:50
Paula Fikkert (Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen)
Dealing with Bad Data in Language Acquisition

12:50-14:00 Lunch

14:00 – 14:55
Christina Tortora (The City University of New York)
To be announced

14:55-15:30
Yang Li (University of Cambridge)
Evidence in incomplete neutralisation: tonal data and Bayesian inference

15:30-15:55 Break

15:55-16:30
João Veríssimo (Universität Potsdam), Vera Heyer (Universität Potsdam), Clare Patterson (Universität Potsdam) & Gunnar Jacob (Universität Potsdam)
Dealing with noise across participants, items, and experiments: The case of non-native morphological processing

16:30 – 17:05
Hélène Giraudo (Université de Toulouse & CNRS) & Serena Dal Maso (Università degli Studi di Verona)
Bad data in psycholinguistic research on morphological processing
17:05 – 18:00
Charles Yang (University of Pennsylvania)
When Big Data is Bad (and Why Small Data is Enough)


Page Updated: 01-Feb-2016