LINGUIST List 27.837

Mon Feb 15 2016

Calls: Historical Linguistics, Text/Corpus Linguistics/Poland

Editor for this issue: Anna White <awhitelinguistlist.org>


Date: 15-Feb-2016
From: Kristin Bech <kristin.bechilos.uio.no>
Subject: Grammar, Discourse, Context: Widening the Horizon for a Theory of Grammatical Change
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Full Title: Grammar, Discourse, Context: Widening the Horizon for a Theory of Grammatical Change

Date: 18-Sep-2016 - 21-Sep-2016
Location: Poznan, Poland
Contact Person: Ruth Möhlig-Falke
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://wa.amu.edu.pl/isle4/

Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics; Text/Corpus Linguistics

Call Deadline: 15-Mar-2016

Meeting Description:

This workshop welcomes linguists working in different theoretical and methodological frameworks on diachronic language change, who specifically look at processes of grammatical change in context. From a pragmatic and discourse-analytic perspective, context may comprise the following:

On the micro-level (van Dijk 2008)
1) the immediate surrounding text of the communicative event in question, i.e. what has also been called co-text (Halliday & Hasan 1985);
2 a) the intertextual and interdiscursive relationship between utterances, texts, genres, and discourses;
b) the intertextual and interdiscursive relationship between spoken and/or written texts and other modes of communication (e.g. pictures, colours, fonts, scripts);
c) the intertextual and interdiscursive relationship between different varieties and languages that are part of the “world of discourse”.
3) the structural context provided by the language system, i.e. the system of interdepencies between lexemes (semantic fields, cognitive domains, collocations, etc.) and grammatical patterns and constructions (Fischer 2007: 116; Möhlig-Falke 2012: 24) which form the linguistic input and underlying cognitive structures (mental grammars) of speakers at any historical stage of the language.

On the macro-level (van Dijk 2008)
1) the extralinguistic social, environmental variables and institutional frames of a specific ‘context of situation’; and
2) the broader sociopolitical and historical context that discursive practices are embedded in and related to.

We invite contributions focusing on one or more of the following central questions:

- What is the influence of (selected levels of) context on processes of grammatical change?
- Does a “contextual” approach add to our knowledge and understanding of causes and mechanisms of grammatical change (e.g. analogy, redundancy and the principle of economy (Los 2012), transparency and simplification, subjectification)?
- In which phase do contextual factors influence a process of grammatical change, in the actuation or implementation phase? (MacMahon 1994)
- What triggers language change? Does cultural (contextual) change precede processes of grammatical change, or does grammatical change happen independently of this?
- What is the relationship between text and context? Text is what we have available for the analysis of historical stages of a language and of diachronic processes of language change. Context needs to be reconstructed and may be up to different interpretations.
- Is it possible to model the influence of context on processes of grammatical change and how can this be done?

It is further possible to focus on the stability of a part of the grammatical system, i.e. its resilience to change, and the role which contextual factors may play in this, e.g:

- Why are some patterns stable over time while others change?
- Why are some languages more stable than others and retain, for instance, complex and non-transparent grammatical constructions, while other languages undergo radical grammatical restructurings? (e.g. German, Icelandic as opposed to Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, English)
- Why are some languages more stable than others and retain, for instance, complex and non-transparent grammatical constructions, while other languages undergo radical grammatical restructurings?
- Which role does context play in the retention of, for instance, non-transparent patterns and constructions?

Call for Papers:

This workshop will be held during ISLE4 (18-21 September 2016, Poznan, day of the workshop TBC). Papers in the workshop will be allotted 20 minutes for presentation and 10 minutes for discussion, in keeping with the format of the conference. Please submit your abstract (300-500 words, excluding the title, linguistic examples and references) through the EasyChair system on the conference website (http://wa.amu.edu.pl/isle4/). The deadline for submissions is 15 March 2016. Notification of acceptance of papers is 25 April 2016.

Convenors: Ruth Möhlig-Falke (Heidelberg University) and Kristin Bech (University of Oslo)


Page Updated: 15-Feb-2016