LINGUIST List 27.905

Fri Feb 19 2016

Calls: Indo-European, Historical Ling, Syntax, Typology/Poland

Editor for this issue: Ashley Parker <ashleylinguistlist.org>


Date: 18-Feb-2016
From: Leonid Kulikov <kulikovligooglemail.com>
Subject: Non-Canonical Subjects: Their Rise and Development (Evidence from Indo-European and Beyond)
E-mail this message to a friend

Full Title: Non-Canonical Subjects: Their Rise and Development (Evidence from Indo-European and Beyond)

Date: 15-Sep-2016 - 17-Sep-2016
Location: Poznan, Poland
Contact Person: Leonid Kulikov
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://wa.amu.edu.pl/plm/2016/Non_canonical

Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics; Syntax; Typology

Language Family(ies): Indo-European

Call Deadline: 31-Mar-2016

Meeting Description:

The recent two decades are marked with a considerable progress in the study of transitivity and grammatical relations (subject, object). Valuable results are achieved both in the study of the notion of prototypical subject and non-canonical subject marking, and in the research of intermediary types, with non-canonical encoding of the core relations (non-nominative/oblique subjects etc.). Meticulous research of subject properties has uncovered an amazing variety of criteria of subjecthood that can be used as a powerful tool for detecting (non-canonical) subjects and, ultimately to arrive at a more adequate definition of subject. Indo-European languages are particularly notorious for their diversity of non-canonical subject marking, ranking from nominative (standard), to dative, genitive, accusative etc., as in Icelandic, Latin, or Hindi.

By now, the synchronic study of subject and transitivity in Indo-European languages has furnished detailed descriptions of syntactic patterns, inventories of features and types and valuable cross-linguistic observations. We have at our disposal well-elaborated catalogues of predicates with non-canonically case-marked subject-like arguments in the earliest attested stages of all branches of the Indo-European language family. Less attention has been paid to the diachronic aspects of the phenomena in question. Although considerable progress has been made in the analysis of the history of constructions with non-canonical subjects in Indo-European and reconstruction of their sources in Proto-Indo-European, many historical processes and phenomena that are relevant for this syntactic domain still need to be elucidated. Many details of the emergence and disappearance of the non-canonical subject marking are still unclear to us, and there is no complete inventory of the basic mechanisms of the rise and evolution of this subject-marking.

Indo-European languages, with their well-documented history and long tradition of historical and comparative research, offer a particularly rich opportunity for a diachronic typological study of the above-listed issues. The aim of this workshop is to bring together scholars interested in comparative research on non-canonical subjects in Indo-European and beyond and to open up new horizons in the study of these phenomena, paying special attention to its diachronic aspects. While the workshop concentrates mainly on evidence from Indo-European, papers on non-Indo-European languages which could be relevant for a diachronic typological study of the issues in question are also welcome.



Call for Papers:

The aim of this workshop is to bring together scholars interested in comparative research on non-canonical subjects in Indo-European and beyond and to open up new horizons in the study of these phenomena, paying special attention to its diachronic aspects. While the workshop concentrates mainly on evidence from Indo-European, papers on non-Indo-European languages which could be relevant for a diachronic typological study of the issues in question are also welcome.

The issues to be addressed include, among others:

- subject criteria and subject properties
- syntactic functions of the subject-like obliques in both ancient and modern Indo-European languages
- mechanisms of the rise or disappearance of non-canonical subject-marking
- semantic classes of predicates with non-canonically case-marked subject-like arguments
- relations between subject marking and transitivity types: evolution of subject-marking with different semantic classes of verbs
- the main evolutionary types (from the point of view of case-marking of subjects) attested for Indo-European
- subject and changes in the type of alignment: the emergence of ergativity out of constructions with non-canonical subjects
- methodological issues of the reconstruction of case-marking of subjects and core arguments in general.

Abstracts should be submitted via EasyChair system. Please check the PLM homepage for further details: http://wa.amu.edu.pl/plm/2016/PLM2016_Abstract_submission

Important Dates:

A deadline for abstract submission to our session is 31 March 2016
Notification of acceptance for papers is due 25 April 2016


Page Updated: 19-Feb-2016