LINGUIST List 28.2736

Mon Jun 19 2017

Calls: Gen Ling, Historical Ling, Morphology, Syntax

Editor for this issue: Sarah Robinson <srobinsonlinguistlist.org>


Date: 16-Jun-2017
From: Svenja Kranich <skranichuni-bonn.de>
Subject: Lost in change (DGfS 2018 Workshop)
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Full Title: Lost in change (DGfS 2018 Workshop)

Date: 07-Mar-2018 - 09-Mar-2018
Location: Stuttgart, Baden-Württemberg, Germany
Contact Person: Svenja Kranich
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >

Linguistic Field(s): General Linguistics; Historical Linguistics; Morphology; Syntax

Call Deadline: 15-Aug-2017

Meeting Description:

Lost in change: Causes and processes in the loss of grammatical constructions and categories

Workshop at DGfS 2018, 7-9 March 2018, Stuttgart

Organisers: Svenja Kranich (University of Bonn) and Tine Breban (University of Manchester)

Studies in language change have taken great steps in uncovering how new grammatical constructions and categories come into being and explaining why they emerge. Comparatively little is known about the ‘negative end’ of change. While some general concepts have been put forward (e.g. Givón’s (1979) cline from discourse > syntax > morphology > morphophonemics > zero) and individual cases been discussed (e.g. loss of V2 in English), neither the possible motivations nor the typical steps constructions and categories undergo ‘on their way out’ have been systematically investigated on a broad cross-linguistic basis. The aim of this workshop is to close this gap.

More detailed information is provided in the Call for Papers.

Call for Papers:

Background and aim of the workshop:
Studies in language change have taken great steps in uncovering how new grammatical constructions and categories come into being and explaining why they emerge. Comparatively little is known about the 'negative end' of change. While some general concepts have been put forward (e.g. Givón's (1979) cline from discourse > syntax > morphology > morphophonemics > zero) and individual cases been discussed (e.g. loss of V2 in English), neither the possible motivations nor the typical steps constructions and categories undergo 'on their way out' have been systematically investigated on a broad cross-linguistic basis. The aim of this workshop is to close this gap. Some of the specific questions the workshop seeks to shed light on are:

Motivations/causes: Under which conditions do constructions or categories get lost? Are there particular language-internal or external contexts favoring loss (e.g. competition, language contact, other changes in a grammatical system)?
Steps in the process: Are cross-linguistic generalizations possible of these steps (e.g. drop in frequency, context restrictions)? Is loss always gradual?
Consequences: How does the language system cope after loss of especially a whole category (e.g. new means of coding vs. loss of coded distinction altogether)?
Theoretical modeling: Which theoretical models (e.g. competition model, optimality theory, grammaticalization) can account best for the reasons and paths of loss?

We invite contributions from all areas of diachronic linguistics, and aim to bring together papers on a wide variety of phenomena dealing with a typologically diverse set of languages from different theoretical perspectives. Contributions should ideally focus on far-reaching grammatical changes such as the complete loss of a category, a major reduction of grammatical distinctions or loss of the prototypical member of a paradigm and address their general implications for our understanding of loss.

Practical information:
Abstracts should be submitted by August 15, 2017 via email to skranichuni-bonn.de. Preferred formats: pdf and doc. Maximum length: 500 words excluding references.
Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by August, 31, 2017.

References
Givón, Talmy. 1979. On Understanding Grammar. New York: Academic Press.


Page Updated: 19-Jun-2017