LINGUIST List 3.169

Sat 22 Feb 1992

Qs: Chinese, Dictionary, Final Devoicing

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. Ralf Thiede, CP/IP system in Chinese--query
  2. , Re: 3.164 Genes and Language Disorders
  3. , RE: dictionary writing - request for help
  4. Johanna Rubba, Re: 3.053 Origin of "Honkie"
  5. Ron Southerland, Language and Power Course
  6. , Spanish la -> el
  7. , Final Devoicing
  8. Dr M Sebba, query about Pasilingua

Message 1: CP/IP system in Chinese--query

Date: Fri, 21 Feb 92 14:43:39 ESCP/IP system in Chinese--query
From: Ralf Thiede <FEN00RT1UNCCVM.bitnet>
Subject: CP/IP system in Chinese--query

 I am trying to find some papers or articles or books on Chinese syntax
which use the Government-and-Binding paradigm of projection grammar. A
student of mine and I are trying to learn whether Chinese has a complete
CP system (maybe not, we suspect) or IP system (probably no AGR), but we
can't find anything in print so far within the current theory to educate
ourselves. Can anyone give pointers?
 Ralf Thiede
 UNCC Dept. of English
 <FEN00RT1UNCCVM>
 <rthiedeunccvax.uncc.edu>
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Message 2: Re: 3.164 Genes and Language Disorders

Date: Fri, 21 Feb 1992 10:08 ESTRe: 3.164 Genes and Language Disorders
From: <SJS97ALBNYVMS.bitnet>
Subject: Re: 3.164 Genes and Language Disorders

Does anyone know the "snail mail" addresses for Michael Stubbs and Stephen
Levinson, both of the UK? Please send responses directly to: SJS97ALBNYVMS.
S. Sigman
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Message 3: RE: dictionary writing - request for help

Date: Fri, 21 Feb 1992 16:34:56 RE: dictionary writing - request for help
From: <SEGUINVAXS.SSCL.UWO.CA>
Subject: RE: dictionary writing - request for help


Kenn Harper is a linguist who has been asked to evaluate a dictionary project
for the Government of the Northwest Territories. He does not have easy access
to good library resources and would appreciate information on current litera-
ture on dictionary development. Issues of particular relevance for this project
include: methodologies, software, published reviews of other dictionaries,
principles of dictionary construction; innovative projects from other language
areas, etc.

Kenn needs information very quickly as a short deadline has been set. He is
not on email, and can be reached either by
phone (819) 979-4616
FAX (819) 979-4207
or by mail at:
Kenn Harper, Box 670 Iqaluit, NWT, X0A 0H0, Canada.
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Message 4: Re: 3.053 Origin of "Honkie"

Date: Fri, 21 Feb 92 15:52:10 PSRe: 3.053 Origin of "Honkie"
From: Johanna Rubba <rubbabend.UCSD.EDU>
Subject: Re: 3.053 Origin of "Honkie"

This isn't about 'honky', but about 'copacetic'. I heard a
whole piece on PBS -- I don't know how many years ago. It was
by a fellow who was a sort of language commentator -- someone
very famous, who is now dead, but I can't for the life of me
remember his name. He had a regular program about words or
language or something. Anyway, he gave a whole story from
Hebrew about 'copacetic'. Maybe someone else on the net
can fill us in -- any Semitists out there who know the story?

Or is speculating about 'honky' taking up enough space??

Jo Rubba - UC San Diego
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Message 5: Language and Power Course

Date: Fri, 21 Feb 92 17:14:53 MSLanguage and Power Course
From: Ron Southerland <southerlacs.ucalgary.ca>
Subject: Language and Power Course


I'll be offering a new course with the above title in the Department of
Linguistics (University of Calgary) in Fall 1992. It will be available to
students beyond the first year and will have no linguistics (or other) pre-
requisites. The course is supposed to address issues of 'language and power'
in areas of racism, sexism, and the discourse of government and business
(advertising). I'm aware of a number of texts/articles in language and
gender and of Robin Lakoff's _Talking Power_. I'd appreciate receiving any
suggestions anyone may have about texts or readings for this course -- and
I'd really like to have general comments or suggestions from anyone who
has taught such a course.

I will summarize to Linguist whatever responses I receive.

Ron Southerland Department of Linguistics The University of Calgary

southerlacs.ucalgary.ca [Internet]
SoutherlandUNCAMULT [Bitnet]
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Message 6: Spanish la -> el

Date: Fri, 21 Feb 92 21:18:56 ESSpanish la -> el
From: <Alexis_Manaster_RamerMTS.cc.Wayne.edu>
Subject: Spanish la -> el

I am informed that the words azucar and avestruz are optionally
feminine, but always take the article el. Are there any Spanish
speakers who would care to send me their feelings about this.
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Message 7: Final Devoicing

Date: Fri, 21 Feb 92 21:39:28 ESFinal Devoicing
From: <Alexis_Manaster_RamerMTS.cc.Wayne.edu>
Subject: Final Devoicing

This is a query directed to linguists familiar with languages
with final devoicing (especially but not limited to Polish,
Russian, Dutch, German, (certain varieties of) Yiddish, and
Catalan).

It is sometimes claimed that in at least some of these languages
final devoicing can be "suppressed" when you "enunciate" (specifically,
when you put a brief schwa-like vocoid after the final
obstruent). However,
my observation (at least in the case of Polish and Russian) is
that it is possible to enunciate devoiced obstruents, as in the
word ad, in one of two ways, depending on what is MEANT. Thus,
if I want to stress that the word is spelled with a final 'd',
then I can say it with a [d] followed by a brief vocoid of schwa-
like timbre. But if I want to stress that it is pronounced
/at/ and not /ad/ (as in correcting a foreigner who has not learned
to devoice), then I can say it as a [t] followed by a similar
brief vocoid.

The question is whether anybody agrees or disagrees with my
observation for these two languages and whether anybody would
be willing to say whether the same is true or untrue about
any other language with final devoicing (especially but not
limited to the ones listed).

Please respond directly to me, not to the list. And please
indicate whether you would mind being cited in print as
a source. (If anyone knows of published accounts of these
phenomena, please let me know).
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Message 8: query about Pasilingua

Date: Fri, 21 Feb 92 14:38:18 GMquery about Pasilingua
From: Dr M Sebba <eia023cent1.lancs.ac.uk>
Subject: query about Pasilingua

"Orthodox linguists have paid scant attention to [pidgins and creoles].
... apart from Steiner, the inventor of Pasilingua (1885), none of the
pioneers of language-planning seems to have considered them worthy of
study."
 F. Bodmer, The Loom of Language (1943), p. 442
Has anyone any idea who Steiner was, what Pasilingua was like, what
he knew about Pidgins, and / or how he incorporated this knowledge into
his artificial language?
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