LINGUIST List 3.358

Fri 24 Apr 1992

Qs: Binding, Bible, Human Subjects, Gapping

Editor for this issue: <>


Directory

  1. , Binding in German
  2. Stephen Ryberg, Glasgow Bible translation
  3. Kathleen Hubbard, human subject protocols
  4. Michael Meng, articles on gapping

Message 1: Binding in German

Date: Wed, 22 Apr 1992 02:09:57 Binding in German
From: <dmearley.sns.neuphilologie.uni-tuebingen.de>
Subject: Binding in German


I am looking for publications on "Binding of Personal Pronouns in German".
I would be especially interested in discussions of cases involving
backwards-pronominalization, but general articles on binding in German
would be fine too.

Can anybody mail me some references? Please reply to my e-mail adress:
dmearley.sns.neuphilologei.uni-tuebingen.de

---------------
Detmar Meurers
Seminar fuer Natuerlich-Sprachliche Systeme
Tuebingen, Germany
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Message 2: Glasgow Bible translation

Date: Wed, 22 Apr 92 15:06:01 CDGlasgow Bible translation
From: Stephen Ryberg <rybergcasbah.acns.nwu.edu>
Subject: Glasgow Bible translation

The following appeared in the "Britain This Week" column of The Economist,
April 18-24.

	The Church of Scotland gave its blessing to a popular version of
	the New Testament translated into Glasgow street slang. "Jesus
	answered 'Right then, Jimmy, jist you dae the same'", is among
	its offerings.

Does anyone out there have publication/background information on such an
edition? Anyone know of a resource which lists Bible translations of this
variety (vagueness intentional)?

Steve Ryberg
__________________________
Stephen Ryberg
Department of Linguistics
Northwestern University
rybergcasbah.acns.nwu.edu
__________________________
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Message 3: human subject protocols

Date: Thu, 23 Apr 92 23:27:21 -0human subject protocols
From: Kathleen Hubbard <hubbardgarnet.berkeley.edu>
Subject: human subject protocols

I'm wondering whether many of you in phonology and/or phonetics have had much
to do with "protection of human subjects" protocols. I'm told I have to at
least file for an exemption for my dissertation research, though I'm
collecting only the most basic sorts of data -- tonal paradigms, simple
tape recordings for measuring durations, etc. Have any of you had trouble
either from filing such notices or failing to file them? Has anyone had to
file an actual protocol for basic language data collection? The process is
not entirely clear here at Berkeley and I'm curious about the experiences of
other phonetics/phonology researchers.

Kathleen Hubbard
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Message 4: articles on gapping

Date: Fri, 24 Apr 92 18:14:18 BSarticles on gapping
From: Michael Meng <michaelmling.edinburgh.ac.uk>
Subject: articles on gapping

I am currently writing on an essay about non-constituent coordination
and gapping in German, using a GB-style framework. Although the topic has
attracted considerable interest of researchers working within other theories
(Categorial Grammar, GPSG, Word Grammar, Montague Grammar) and older
versions of Transformational Grammar, only little attention seems to
have been paid to it by GB partisans during the last decade.
However, maybe this conclusion - drawn solely from the literature
available to me - is wrong. I would be very grateful for every reference
to recent books, articles and/or work in progress that might be relevant
for my topic, no matter to which theoretical "confession" they are devoted.
Please reply directly to me. I will post a summary if there is interest
in this subject.
Thanks in advance,

Michael
(michaelmling.uk.ac.ed)
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