LINGUIST List 30.1225

Fri Mar 15 2019

Calls: History of Linguistics/France

Editor for this issue: Everett Green <everettlinguistlist.org>


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Date: 13-Mar-2019
From: Jean-Michel Fortis <fortis.jean-michelneuf.fr>
Subject: Simplicity and Complexity of Languages in the History of Linguistic Theories
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Full Title: Simplicity and Complexity of Languages in the History of Linguistic Theories
Short Title: shesl-htl2020

Date: 23-Jan-2020 - 25-Jan-2020
Location: Paris, France
Contact Person: Jean-Michel Fortis
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: http://shesl-htl2020.sciencesconf.org

Linguistic Field(s): History of Linguistics

Call Deadline: 01-Jul-2019

Meeting Description:

The goal of this conference is to explore the ways in which, through the history of linguistic theories, languages have been evaluated in terms of their complexity.

Call for Papers:

The goal of this conference is to explore the ways in which, through the history of linguistic theories, languages have been evaluated in terms of their complexity.

The conference is organized by the learned society SHESL (Société d’Histoire et d’Epistémologie des Sciences du Langage) and the research unit HTL (Histoire des Théories Linguistiques), Paris Diderot University, France.

Deadline for submission : July 1, 2019 (abstract: 1 page maximum)
Contact : shesl-htl2020sciencesconf.org
Website : https://shesl-htl2020.sciencesconf.org
Location: Paris, France
Dates: January 23-25 2020
Registration fees: 50 € (35 € for students and persons without a permanent position)
Free for members of SHESL

Proposals may deal with the following topics and concern any period or cultural area (the list is not intended to be exhaustive):

- The complexity scale and the various notions of complexity that have been adduced so far (e.g. “absolute”, i.e. in terms of grammatical description, or user-relative, in terms of processing costs); the various trade-offs involved in defining complexity;
- Hierarchical typologies, i.e. rankings of languages according to some criterial feature(s), such as the degree to which they have grammatical “form”, or approach “natural order”; the relation of such features to cognitive universals, i.e. the idea that languages which are cognitively “natural” should be simpler for speakers to learn and to use;
- The history of conceptions bearing on the complexification (or simplification) of languages, whether in phylogeny or in ontogeny;
- The various attempts made at “simplifying” languages;
- The cultural and social environments and the scientific arguments which have been conducive to a rejection of forms of linguistic hierarchization in terms of complexity (i.e. arguments in favor of the idea that all languages are equally complex);
- The analytic / synthetic scale; the axiological import of this scale and its consequences for the conception of universal languages;
- The aesthetic evaluation of languages, among other aspects, the rhetorical potential afforded by their structure and their complexity, the literary benefits of complexity etc.

Log in to the website for abstract submission.




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