LINGUIST List 31.2417

Wed Jul 29 2020

Calls: Discourse Analysis/Switzerland

Editor for this issue: Lauren Perkins <laurenlinguistlist.org>



Date: 29-Jul-2020
From: Lilian Lem Atanga <l.l.atangagmail.com>
Subject: Political discourse in the era of COVID-19: Gender, Power and Ideology
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Full Title: Political discourse in the era of COVID-19: Gender, Power and Ideology

Date: 27-Jun-2021 - 02-Jul-2021
Location: Winterthur, Switzerland
Contact Person: Diana Boxer
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >

Linguistic Field(s): Discourse Analysis

Call Deadline: 25-Oct-2020

Meeting Description:

This session seeks to examine how political ideologies have contributed to shaping gender and power discourses on COVID-19, how they serve to include or exclude, and how they are sustained, challenged, or subverted. Painter and Qiu (2020) note that the discourse of social distancing, vital to mitigate the spread of the novel coronavirus, is also hinged on political beliefs.

Call for Papers:

The discursive construction of COVID-19 has largely hinged on power relations and political ideology. This panel seeks to examine how political ideologies have contributed to shaping gender and power discourses on COVID-19, how they serve to include or exclude, and how they are sustained, challenged, or subverted. Painter and Qiu (2020) note that the discourse of social distancing, vital to mitigate the spread of the novel coronavirus, is also hinged on political beliefs. Moreover, the discourse of compliance has become politically motivated, with perceptions of risk along the lines of political ideologies (Barrios and Hochberg 2020). COVID-19 has taken the world by storm, with no one government having anticipated its effects. The political discourse surrounding COVID-19 has been diverse, ranging from labeling the virus to shifting blame (Yeung 2020). In the US, some adherence to CDC and WHO directives has hinged along party lines (Barrios and Hochberg 2020). Indeed, across the globe COVID-19-related behavior has been highly politicized.

The papers included in this panel cover a range of political discourse surrounding the pandemic: (social) media discourse, gendered discourses about COVID by different state leaders across the world, and discourses resulting in fragmenting previous political ideologies and subverting relations of power with political leadership. A group of international scholars will form part of the panel, including the conveners, Diana Boxer (US) and Lilian Atanga (Cameroon). Papers will be presented by both conveners: 1) Atanga on The Politics of COVID in African Contexts; and 2) Boxer and Judith Lejeck on Trump’s blame shifting. Recruited participants are 1) Taiwo Oloruntoba-Oju (Nigeria) on the construction (and deconstruction) of gender asymmetries in conversations between women and men in the wake of COVID in the Nigerian setting; and 2) Stefanie Schnurr, Sophie Riessner-Rubicek and Carolyn Debray (UK). This latter paper explores the pragmatics of inclusion and exclusion by analyzing the (purportedly positive) media coverage women head of states world-wide are receiving for their handling of the Covid19 pandemic.

Two discussants will also participate: John Wilson (Northern Ireland) and Cornelia Ilie (Sweden). The panel will be open to papers related to its proposed theme.

We welcome abstracts of no more than 300 words in areas that deal with any of the issues raised in the proposal. Submit abstracts to l.l.atangagmail.com latest 25 October 2020.

References
Yeung, E. Y. (2020). COVID-19 PPE shortage: The real crisis is the blame-shifting culture in medicine. CMAJ, 192(20).
Wenham, C., Smith, J., & Morgan, R. (2020). COVID-19: the gendered impacts of the outbreak. The Lancet, 395(10227), 846-848.
Painter, M., & Qiu, T. (2020). Political beliefs affect compliance with covid-19 social distancing orders. Available at SSRN 3569098.
Barrios, J. M., & Hochberg, Y. (2020). Risk perception through the lens of politics in the time of the covid-19 pandemic (No. w27008). National Bureau of Economic Research.




Page Updated: 29-Jul-2020