LINGUIST List 31.2490

Thu Aug 06 2020

Calls: Pragmatics, Typology/Switzerland

Editor for this issue: Lauren Perkins <laurenlinguistlist.org>



Date: 05-Aug-2020
From: Martin Pfeiffer <martin.pfeiffergermanistik.uni-freiburg.de>
Subject: Cross-linguistic Approaches to Requests for Confirmation
E-mail this message to a friend

Full Title: Cross-linguistic Approaches to Requests for Confirmation

Date: 27-Jun-2021 - 02-Jul-2021
Location: Winterthur, Switzerland
Contact Person: Martin Pfeiffer
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >

Linguistic Field(s): Pragmatics; Typology

Call Deadline: 25-Oct-2020

Meeting Description:

''Cross-linguistic approaches to requests for confirmation''

Katharina König (University of Münster)
Martin Pfeiffer (University of Freiburg)

In recent years, question-response sequences have been studied widely in cross-linguistic interactional research (Enfield et al. 2019; Enfield et al. 2010). While these large-scale studies yield interesting results, e.g. in terms of overall distributional differences of various question and answer types, to date little is known about cross-linguistic similarities and differences in the formatting of particular question-response pairings. Request for confirmation sequences constitute a promising field of study in this endeavor as they play a central role in documenting what speakers assume to be relevant information for the ongoing interaction and in negotiating epistemic rights and access at the same time (Bolden 2010; Seuren & Huiskes 2017; Heritage 2012; Pomerantz 1988; Raymond 2010).

Bringing together qualitative and/or quantitative contributions on the use of requests for confirmation in different languages, the panel will address the following research questions:
- How do languages differ in the design of request for confirmation sequences? Which linguistic resources are used to mark an utterance as a request for confirmation?
- (How) are RfCs distinguished from other related social actions (such as requests for information, requests for affirmation, requests for clarification or newsmarks) in different languages?
- Are there differences in the distributional patterns of answer possibilities? Which role do multimodal resources play in doing confirmation or disconfirmation?
- Which conversational activities lend themselves to RfCs? In which overall communicative projects are RfCs embedded?
- In which way are RfCs anchored in prior talk or nonverbal actions?

Papers in the panel will include contributions from the scientific network ''Interactional Linguistics - Discourse particles from a cross-linguistic perspective'' funded by the German Research Foundation but we also invite other scholars to present their cross-linguistic research.

Call for Papers:

Abstracts (250-500 words incl. references) should be based on research that is clearly in progress, with a well-formulated research question, and with a good description of the types of data used and of the approach. They should be submitted via IPrA’s submission system https://ipra2021.exordo.com/ before 25 October 2020 (for further instructions, see https://pragmatics.international/page/CfP).

References:
Bolden, Galina B. 2010. 'Articulating the unsaid' via and-prefaced formulations of others' talk. Discourse Studies 12(1). 5-32.

Enfield, N. J., Tanya Stivers, Penelope Brown, Christina Englert, Kathariina Harjunpää, Makoto Hayashi, Trine Heinemann, Gertie Hoymann, Tiina Keisanen, Mirka Rauniomaa, Chase W. Raymond, Federico Rossano, Kyung-Eun Yoon, Inge Zwitserlood & Stephen C. Levinson. 2019. Polar answers. Journal of Linguistics 55(2). 277-304.

Enfield, Nick, Tanya Stivers & Stephen C. Levinson. 2010. Question-response sequences in conversation across ten languages: An introduction. Journal of Pragmatics 42(10). 2615-2619.

Heritage, John. 2012. Epistemics in action: Actions formation and territories of knowledge. Research on Language and Social Interaction 45(1). 1-29.

Pomerantz, Anita. 1988. Offering a candidate answer: An information seeking strategy. Communication Monographs 55. 360-373.

Raymond, Geoffrey. 2010. Grammar and social relations: Alternative forms of yes/no-type initiating actions in health visitor interactions. In Alice F. Freed & Susan Ehrlich (eds.), ''Why do you ask?'': The function of questions in institutional discourse, 87-107. New York: Oxford University Press.

Seuren, Lucas M. & Mike Huiskes. 2017. Confirmation or elaboration: What do Yes/No declaratives want? Research on Language & Social Interaction 50(2). 188-205.




Page Updated: 06-Aug-2020