LINGUIST List 31.3113

Wed Oct 14 2020

Confs: Cog Sci, Neuroling, Pragmatics, Psycholing, Semantics/Online

Editor for this issue: Lauren Perkins <laurenlinguistlist.org>



Date: 12-Oct-2020
From: Giuliano Armenante <giuliano.armenanteuni-tuebingen.de>
Subject: Processing Presuppositions: Theoretical and Methodological Approaches
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Processing Presuppositions: Theoretical and Methodological Approaches

Date: 19-Oct-2020 - 21-Oct-2020
Location: Tübingen [Online via Zoom], Germany
Contact: Giuliano Armenante
Contact Email: < click here to access email >
Meeting URL: https://uni-tuebingen.de/forschung/forschungsschwerpunkte/sonderforschungsbereiche/sfb-833/forschungsprojekte/b2-bottfrankejaegerjanczyk/workshop-2020/

Linguistic Field(s): Cognitive Science; Neurolinguistics; Pragmatics; Psycholinguistics; Semantics

Meeting Description:

The workshop “Processing Presuppositions: Theoretical and Methodological Approaches” is organized by Projects B1 and B2 of the SFB 833 “The Construction of Meaning” at the University of Tübingen and will be held online on October 19 and 21, 2020.

Presuppositions have received considerable attention in linguistic theory over the past decades, with a surge of experimental work in this domain in recent years.

Most work on presupposition theory has focused on two main issues: ‘the triggering problem’ (Abrusán, 2016; Beaver, 1997; Schwarz, 2016) and ‘the projection problem’ (Beaver, 1997; Schwarz, 2016). While the former is associated with the source of presuppositional content, which has been argued to stem from lexical material (the semantic view; e.g., Frege, 1892 and Strawson, 1950) or from expectations formed by discourse participants (the pragmatic view; see Stalnaker, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1998), the latter is concerned with when and why presuppositions in embedded clauses can be maintained - an issue that is still under debate.

Although no consensus has thus been reached on a viable theory of presupposition, empirical research has grown in importance by drawing from psycholinguistic methods. These, in return, provide means to test subtle predictions of various competing theoretical proposals and enhance our understanding of natural language processing (e.g., Brasoveanu & Dotlačil, 2015; Chemla & Schlenker, 2012; Domaneschi & Di Paola, 2018; Schwarz, 2015; Schwarz & Tiemann, 2017; Shetreet, Alexander, Romoli, Chierchia & Kuperberg, 2019). To this end, the time course of presupposition processing promises to offer insights that are essential to the modeling of incrementality.

The workshop aims at providing a forum for those scholars whose research tackles current issues in presupposition theory and is especially grounded in empirical evidence. Topics to be discussed include:
- Incremental and predictive processing of presupposition resolution
- Presupposition projection and accommodation
- Processing of presuppositions in relation to other pragmatic inferences
- Appropriateness of experimental methods used to test predictions for presupposition-related phenomena

For further information, please visit our website: https://bit.ly/2t1iUyY

Program Information:

The workshop provides a forum for researchers investigating presupposition-related phenomena and intends to contribute to the debate on long-standing issues of the theory in light of the empirical evidence provided by psycho- and neurolinguistic methods.

Workshop venue: University of Tübingen (held virtually via Zoom web conferencing)
Workshop registration: pspprocessingsfb833.uni-tuebingen.de

Invited Speakers:
Nadine Bade (ENS Paris)
Chris Cummins (University of Edinburgh)
Simona Di Paola (University of Genoa)
Jakub Dotlačil (University of Amsterdam)
Jacopo Romoli (Ulster University)
Philippe Schlenker (Institut Jean-Nicod, CNRS; New York University)
Einat Shetreet (Tel Aviv University)

Organizers: G. Armenante, P. Augurzky, N. Balbach, O. Bott, M. Franke, G. Jäger, M. Janczyk, F. Schlotterbeck, C. Schneider, B. Stolterfoht, R. Ulrich.




Page Updated: 14-Oct-2020