LINGUIST List 31.3692

Wed Dec 02 2020

Books: Gemination, Lenition, and Vowel Lengthening: Goblirsch

Editor for this issue: Jeremy Coburn <jecoburnlinguistlist.org>



Date: 02-Dec-2020
From: Rachel Tonkin <rtonkincambridge.org>
Subject: Gemination, Lenition, and Vowel Lengthening: Goblirsch
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Title: Gemination, Lenition, and Vowel Lengthening
Subtitle: On the History of Quantity in Germanic
Series Title: Cambridge Studies in Linguistics 157
Published: 2020
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
                http://cambridge.org

Book URL: https://www.cambridge.org/us/academic/subjects/languages-linguistics/phonetics-and-phonology/gemination-lenition-and-vowel-lengthening-history-quantity-germanic?format=PB

Author: Kurt Goblirsch
Paperback: ISBN: 9781108928946 Pages: Price: U.S. $ 32.99
Paperback: ISBN: 9781108928946 Pages: Price: U.K. £ 24.99
Paperback: ISBN: 9781108928946 Pages: Price: Europe EURO 29.17
Abstract:

The processes of gemination, lenition, and vowel lengthening are central to the study of phonology, as they reveal much about the treatment of quantity in a given language. Using data from older language stages, modern dialects and standard languages, this study examines the interdependence of vowel and consonant quantity in the history of the Germanic branch of Indo-European. Kurt Goblirsch focusses on the various geminations in Old Germanic languages (West Germanic gemination, glide strengthening, and expressive gemination), open syllable lengthening in German, Dutch, Frisian, English, and Scandinavian languages, and the major lenitions in High German, Low German, and Danish, as well as minor lenitions in Bavarian, Franconian, and Frisian dialects. All of these changes are related to the development of the Germanic languages from distinctive segmental length to complementary length to syllable cut. The discussion challenges traditional theoretical assumptions about quantity change in Germanic languages to argue for a new account whereby, gemination, lenition, and vowel lengthening are interrelated.


1. Theoretical preliminaries; 2. The road to complementary length: gemination and quantity in Old Germanic; 3. Arriving at the goal: vowel lengthening in Middle Germanic; 4. The reaction of consonants: lenition in Middle Germanic; 5. Quantity types in Modern Germanic.

Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics
                            Phonology
Language Family(ies): Germanic

Written In: English (eng)

See this book announcement on our website:
https://linguistlist.org/pubs/books/get-book.cfm?BookID=149435



Page Updated: 02-Dec-2020